skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, September 21, 2023

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Consumer health advocates urge governor to sign bill package; NY protests for Jewish democracy heighten as Netanyahu meets UN today; Multiple Utah cities set to use ranked-choice voting in next election.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Pentagon wants to help service members denied benefits under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," advocates back a new federal office of gun violence prevention, and a top GOP member assures the Ukrainian president more help is coming.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

An Indigenous project in South Dakota seeks to protect tribal data sovereignty, advocates in North Carolina are pushing back against attacks on public schools, and Arkansas wants the hungriest to have access to more fruits and veggies.

Report Offers Recommendations for MT Elk Management at 'Crossroads'

play audio
Play

Wednesday, October 5, 2022   

After a gathering of hunters, landowners and wildlife managers, a new report draws some conclusions on how Montana can better manage its elk population.

The Montana Citizens Elk Management Coalition has published a report on the Elk Management Symposium, which took place in August.

Kathy Hadley, a board member of the Montana Wildlife Federation and a hunter who spoke at the symposium, said management is at a crossroads in Montana.

"We have had declining harvest rates on public lands over the last few years of elk, declining numbers of elk on public lands, and a problem of having too many elk on private lands," Hadley outlined. "So there's an imbalance in the system that didn't use to be here."

The Montana Citizens Elk Management Coalition developed three policy recommendations based on the meeting. Hadley noted the symposium took place while Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks begins to design a new elk-management plan.

Hadley pointed out one of the recommendations is to update landowner incentive programs such as Block Management, which provides funds to landowners in exchange for opening up access to their lands to hunters. She added the program has about 1,200 landowners enrolled and opens up access to more than six million acres. Hadley believes hunters should deal with the issue of too many elk.

"Maybe we need to increase payments to private landowners who allow hunters on their lands," Hadley suggested. "And we just thought maybe that particular program might be useful to update it to engage more landowners who are having these problems."

The other recommendations include revising the structure of hunting seasons and exploring new funding models for restoring habitat. Hadley emphasized lawmakers from both parties were part of the symposium, and so she hopes to engage them in the 2023 legislative session on these issues.

"Wildlife management, historically, has been bipartisan, and we're trying really hard to get us back to that place," Hadley stressed.

Disclosure: The Montana Wildlife Federation contributes to our fund for reporting on Climate Change/Air Quality, Endangered Species & Wildlife, Environment, and Public Lands/Wilderness. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.


get more stories like this via email
more stories
Among 12- to 17-year-olds nationwide, 2.08 million or 8.33% report using drugs in the last month. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

In the wake of the devastating overdose epidemic in North Carolina, the state's Department of Health and Human Services is stepping up to aid …


Social Issues

play sound

In cities across the globe, including the Michigan city of Midland, various organizations are commemorating International Day of Peace today…

Social Issues

play sound

Georgia's young people could shift the political landscape of the state in the near future. New data from the Brookings Institution indicates that …


According to the EPA, tropical storms and hurricanes have become more intense during the past 20 years.(Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

In rural Alabama, where hurricanes and tornadoes are a constant threat, communities often struggle with damage and limited resources for extended …

Social Issues

play sound

A group of West Virginia Democratic delegates is calling for a special session to address West Virginia University's budget shortfall. Del. Evan …

Arborglyphs, or tree carvings, created by Hispanic sheep herders in the Medicine Bow National Forest date back to the early 1900s. (Amanda Castañeda)

Social Issues

play sound

While many Wyomingites of Hispanic descent came from Mexico, there is a lesser-known population from the old Spanish settlements of northern New …

play sound

People in rural America are five times as likely to live in so-called "ambulance deserts," areas far from an ambulance service or station, than those …

Health and Wellness

play sound

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes is on the rise in Mississippi. About one in seven Mississippians lives with diabetes. Jernard A. Wells, cookbook …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright © 2021