skip to main content
skip to newscasts

Thursday, April 18, 2024

Public News Service Logo
facebook instagram linkedin reddit youtube twitter
view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

A new study shows health disparities cost Texas billions of dollars; Senate rejects impeachment articles against Mayorkas, ending trial against Cabinet secretary; Iowa cuts historical rural school groups.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

The Senate dismisses the Mayorkas impeachment. Maryland Lawmakers fail to increase voting access. Texas Democrats call for better Black maternal health. And polling confirms strong support for access to reproductive care, including abortion.

view newscast page
play newscast audioPlay

Rural Wyoming needs more vocational teachers to sustain its workforce pipeline, Ohio environmental advocates fear harm from a proposal to open 40-thousand forest acres to fracking and rural communities build bike trail systems to promote nature, boost the economy.

KY Bill Nullifying Federal Gun Laws Heads to Governor’s Desk

play audio
Play

Monday, March 20, 2023   

A bill to make it more difficult for local police to enforce federal gun laws and in some cases criminally penalize them, now heads to Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear's desk.

Kentucky lawmakers have secured enough votes to override a veto of House Bill 153, which bans state and local law enforcement and other public officials from enforcing federal firearms regulations enacted after Jan. 1, 2021.

Cathy Hobart, a volunteer for Kentucky Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, said she is concerned the measure could hamper efforts to protect communities from rising levels of gun violence.

"What we know is that the more guns that are in circulation, the more likely they are to be stolen, the more likely they are to get into the hands of people that have no business having those guns like children and criminals," Hobart pointed out.

According to Mental Health America, 85% of suicide attempts with a firearm result in death. More than 800 Kentuckians died by suicide in 2020, and 65% involved a firearm.

Kentuckians in crisis can call 988 24 hours a day, seven days a week to speak with suicide prevention and mental health counselors.

Hobart added it is not up to states to decide which federal laws they are going to enforce. She also pointed out the legislation's vague wording could create confusion among police officers.

"It makes it difficult for law enforcement to know which laws to enforce," Hobart contended. "That will lead to confusion, we think it will lead to more gun crime in the long run."

Supporters of the bill argue the federal government, not the state of Kentucky, is responsible for enforcing its own gun laws. Last week President Biden signed an executive order strengthening background check requirements for firearms dealers.


get more stories like this via email

more stories
Environmental advocates are asking California's next state budget to prioritize climate mitigation and cut tax breaks for fossil fuel companies. (The Climate Center)

Environment

play sound

As state budget negotiations continue, groups fighting climate change are asking California lawmakers to cut subsidies for oil and gas companies …


Health and Wellness

play sound

Health disparities in Texas are not only making some people sick, but affecting the state's economy. A new study shows Texas is losing $7 billion a …

Environment

play sound

City and county governments are feeling the pinch of rising operating costs but in Wisconsin, federal incentives are driving a range of local …


The beans from the velvet mesquite are known as "pechitas." They are edible and have served as important starch in the diets of Indigenous people. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

play sound

By Max Graham for Grist.Broadcast version by Alex Gonzalez for Arizona News Connection reporting for the Solutions Journalism Network-Public News Serv…

Social Issues

play sound

Last year's Medicaid expansion in South Dakota increased eligibility to another 51,000 adults but a new report showed among people across the state wh…

Senate Bill 2019, sponsored by Rep. Shane Reeves, R-Bedford, is expected to be signed by the governor. It would take effect July 1, 2024. (18percentgrey/Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

play sound

There is light at the end of the tunnel for Tennesseans struggling with opioid addiction, as a bill has been passed to increase access to treatment …

Environment

play sound

The New York HEAT Act might not make the final budget. The bill reduces the state's reliance on natural gas and cuts ratepayer costs by eliminating …

Social Issues

play sound

Washington joins a handful of states to do away with mandatory meetings for employees on political or religious matters. Sometimes known as captive …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021