Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - CO: Early Childhood Education

During the last recession, 40,000 Colorado children fell into poverty, and the state's child poverty rate did not return to pre-recession levels for five years. (PxHere)

DENVER -- Children's advocates are urging Colorado's U.S. Senators -- Republican Cory Gardner and Democrat Michael Bennet -- to move quickly to pass

Census numbers determine how the federal government distributes taxpayer dollars to states for education, food assistance, health care, housing and many children's programs. (U.S. Census Bureau)

DENVER --The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way nonprofits delivering in-home early-childhood development programs connect with families. As the deadline for the 2020 census draws nearer, Heather Tritten, executive director at Parent Possible, said her group's home visitors are reaching out to

The U.S. Census Bureau has extended the deadline for collecting data to Oct. 31 because of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. (US Census Bureau)

DENVER -- Colorado's foundations are going all in on efforts to ensure an accurate count in the 2020 census, and with daily life upended by the coronavirus pandemic, the call is out for creative ways to engage all Coloradans in the once-a-decade tally. The Denver-based NextFifty Initiative is hand

The 2020 census has suspended field operations, but forms still can be filled out online at 2020Census.gov, over the phone by calling the number provided in your invitation, and by paper through the mail. (Pixabay)

STERLING, Colo. -- The census is supposed to be a complete count of everyone in the country, but people always are missed, and rural residents tend to be undercounted more frequently than others. State Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg, R-Sterling, who represents some two-thirds of the state's eastern plains,

In 2016, census numbers were tapped to calculate and deliver more than $13 billion for Colorado programs, roughly $2,300 per resident. (Pixabay)

DENVER -- The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Trump administration's efforts to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census, but immigrant rights advocates say the controversy has created a chilling effect that could lead to an undercount. Ananiya Asrat, a volunteer with the Colorado People's All

Colorado counties are getting food stamps to clients faster, and won more than $2 million in federal performance bonuses in 2016 and 2017. (USDA)

DENVER – Colorado counties are making progress getting SNAP benefits – the program formerly known as food stamps – to low-income residents, but there's still room for improvement. Colorado ranks 43rd nationally with just 60 percent of low-income people receiving benefits, below th

Mercury pollution in the U.S. has declined by 80 percent since 2012. The neurotoxic heavy metal has been shown to disrupt fetal brain development. (Tony Webster/Wikimedia Commons)

LAFAYETTE, Colo. - Moms from Colorado and 14 other states testified this week in Washington, D.C., at the only hearing scheduled by the Environmental Protection Agency on its plans to repeal some air pollution protections at coal plants. Former Lafayette Mayor Christine Berg of Lafayette, a mother

Cereal, with or without milk, is the top menu choice for Denver Public School students. (USDA)

DENVER – Kids are back in school, and that means regular access to nutritious food for many Colorado children. Theresa Peña, regional coordinator for outreach and engagement with Denver Public Schools, says it's hard to learn on an empty stomach, and notes that DPS has made free breakfas

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