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PNS Daily Newscast - September 20, 2018 


Kavanaugh’s accuser given a deadline to talk; President Trump visits hurricane ravaged areas before lashing out at Sessions; and the U.S. Supreme court shines a light on dark money. We're covering those stories and more.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Early Childhood Education

Cereal, with or without milk, is the top menu choice for Denver Public School students. (USDA)

DENVER – Kids are back in school, and that means regular access to nutritious food for many Colorado children. Theresa Peña, regional coordinator for outreach and engagement with Denver Public Schools, says it's hard to learn on an empty stomach, and notes that DPS has made free breakfas

Nearly 90 percent of white children in Colorado have at least one parent with some college education, but Latino parents are less likely to have experience enrolling in college. (White House)

DENVER – More Latinos need to graduate from high school and college in order to have a fighting chance of earning a middle-class income, according to a new Georgetown University report. Currently, nearly 20 percent of Latinos who enrolled in a Colorado public college earn a bachelor's degree

High-quality early learning and care leads to improved educational achievement and health, and increased employment and future earnings. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Lawmakers in Colorado have introduced a measure aimed at helping working families struggling with rising child care costs. The bill would allow families earning $25,000 a year or less to bump their state credit from the current 50 percent up to 80 percent of what they get from the f

Breastfeeding has been shown to improve the health of newborns and can lead to higher IQs. (Getty Images)

DENVER - August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month, and today at Cole Park in Alamosa, an event celebrates nature's solution for getting newborns all the nutrients they need. It's co-sponsored by Valley Wide Health Systems, where Katy Baer directs its Women, Infants and Children program. Bre

Sheila Custard, like many Coloradans – especially working single parents – struggles to find dependable and, most critically, affordable child care. (Joe Mahoney/Mahoney Images)

DENVER - Sheila Custard says her stomach ties up in knots on weekends when she thinks ahead to Mondays and Tuesdays, the two days she struggles to find child care for her 4-year-old daughter. Custard, who moved to Colorado a year ago and works for an Aurora human-resources company, usually can coun

Colorado's report card for delivering food stamps to struggling families is in, and there's good news but room for improvements. (Pixabay)

DENVER – More Colorado families who qualify for food stamps, the program known federally as SNAP, are getting assistance. That's according to new data compiled by Hunger Free Colorado. But, the state still ranks 45th nationally, and some 350,000 Coloradans are not getting help. Kathy Under

One-year-old Alden Mock is tested for lead exposure at the Pediatric Associates office in Montrose. (Nathaniel Wick for The Colorado Trust)

DENVER – Many children in Colorado are at a high risk for lead poisoning, but aren't being tested, according to analysis by The Colorado Trust. State guidelines call for doctors to test children in low-income households, and in housing built before 1978, when lead paint was banned. Mike Va

North High School students in Denver demonstrate against the school-to-prison pipeline during the Dignity in Schools 2015 Week of Action. (Padres & Jóvenes Unidos)

LEADVILLE, CO – A school district in rural Colorado is shifting its approach to student discipline in an effort to keep more kids in school and out of trouble - part of a growing trend away from '90s-era zero-tolerance policies that fed a rise in what's been called the school-to-prison pipelin

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