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PNS Daily Newscast - June 26, 2019 


Mueller to testify in open session; migrant children returned to troubled detention center; plus ending the school-to-prison pipeline, and seeking justice for Native Americans killed at Wounded Knee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Poverty

Colorado ranks in the top five

DENVER – Gov. Jared Polis signed House Bill 1210 into law this week, repealing a 1999 prohibition against local governments creating their own minimum wages. Chris Stiffler, an economist with the Colorado Fiscal Institute, says the measure opens the door for counties and cities to address si

Insulin, a critical medicine for people with diabetes, can cost 90 percent less in Canada than in the United States. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Colorado lawmakers are considering a measure that would help consumers cut their prescription drug costs by allowing them to buy the same medicine from Canada at prices far below those charged in the U.S. According to AARP, the median annual income for Medicare beneficiaries is $26,

Colorado counties are getting food stamps to clients faster, and won more than $2 million in federal performance bonuses in 2016 and 2017. (USDA)

DENVER – Colorado counties are making progress getting SNAP benefits – the program formerly known as food stamps – to low-income residents, but there's still room for improvement. Colorado ranks 43rd nationally with just 60 percent of low-income people receiving benefits, below th

A new plan to prepare for an aging population hopes to harness years of work experience of older Coloradans who want to volunteer or need to remain active in the workforce for financial reasons. (Pixabay)

DENVER – By 2030, one quarter of Colorado's population will be age 60 or older, and a report released this month lays out a road map for navigating this dramatic shift in demographics. Christian Itin, chairman of the state’s Strategic Action Planning Group on Aging, says every aspect o

Eighty-six percent of small businesses surveyed support a state retirement plan, in part because it would help them attract and retain workers. (TaxCredits.net/Flickr)

DENVER – Nearly half of private sector workers in Colorado, more than 750,000 people in their prime working years, do not have access to a retirement savings plan at work. The Colorado Secure Savings Plan, a measure expected to be introduced in the state legislature later this month, would a

Under current law, SNAP beneficiaries aged 18-49 not raising children cannot receive benefits for more than three months in a three-year period unless they are employed or are enrolled in a job-training program. (Maxpixel)

DENVER — The Trump administration's proposal to expand work requirements for SNAP benefits - the program formerly known as food stamps - is meant to get more people back into the workforce. But critics argue there’s a far better approach. Kate Kasper, director of public policy at Hunger

Three in four kids who lost health coverage in 2017 live in states that had not expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act. (Pixnio)

DENVER – For the first time in a decade, the number of uninsured children in the United States has gone up. According to a new Georgetown University report, the number of uninsured kids rose by more than 275,000 in 2017, and nearly 4 million children in the U.S. now lack coverage. Erin Mille

Immigrants applying for food stamps for their U.S. citizen children do not have to provide agencies with their personal immigration status. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Children's advocates are sounding the alarm about a recent proposal by the Trump administration that would make it easier to deny immigrants green cards by expanding the definition of what it means to be a "public charge," or dependent on government programs. Anya Rose, policy analy

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