Newscasts

PNS Daily News - September 16, 2019 


New allegations emerge against Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh; and a new report says a lightning strike is more likely than a forced arbitration win.

2020Talks - September 16, 2019. (3 min.)  


2020 presidential hopefuls tweet about more sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and Democrats who didn't make it onto last week's debate stage continue their grassroots approaches.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MT: Environment

Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants dropped nearly 82 percent after the EPA put stricter emission limits in place in 2012. (Tim Evanson/Wikimedia Commons)

HELENA, Mont. – The Trump administration is set to weaken standards limiting emissions of mercury and other toxic pollutants from coal-fired power plants. Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler has indicated that his agency will maintain the Obama-era Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. Howev

Members of the

BOZEMAN, Mont. – A growing number of Montana businesses and cities say they're committed to reaching the climate goals outlined in the 2015 Paris Agreement, despite the Trump administration's decision to pull out of it. The "We Are Still In" campaign includes more than 3,500 businesses, gove

A wildlife biologist says wolves and other large predators have an innate ability to find diseased prey in herds. (Tupulak/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – Could wolves and other large predators be border guards in the fight against Chronic Wasting Disease? One biologist believes so, as CWD, an infectious neurological disease that affects deer, elk and moose populations, spreads in the Mountain West. Biologist Gary Wolfe, a fo

Sixty million bison once roamed North America, but only a small fraction of that number remain. (American Prairie Reserve)

BOZEMAN, Mont. – The Smithsonian is partnering with American Prairie Reserve to research and restore one of the country's most treasured landscapes. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute does science and conservation work around the world, and is bringing that expertise to APR's reser

Unlike some other states, Montana doesn't have setback limits mandating how far away wells must be from buildings and homes. (Northern Plains Resource Council)

HELENA, Mont. – The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday held its only public hearing on a proposal to roll back regulations on methane leaking for the oil and gas industry. The meeting took place in Denver, but advocates for health and the environment traveled to it from around the

Anson Nygaard, a veteran who lives in Montana, says the thought of

HELENA, Mont. – With Veterans Day approaching, one Montana vet is speaking up for public lands. Anson Nygaard spent two years on active duty in Iraq and Afghanistan and when he returned in 2012, decided to hike the Pacific Crest Trail. Nygaard says the trek helped him re-calibrate and settle

As temperatures have gone up over the past century, many glaciers in Glacier National Park have melted. (Blase Reardon/USGS)

HELENA, Mont. – Far from being a future threat, climate change already is making national parks hotter and the effects could get much worse, according to a first-of-its-kind study. Researchers went back to 1895 to chart temperatures and found they're rising twice as fast in the country's nat

Last week, the Interior Department undid regulations that prevent methane flaring on drilling operations. (Tim Hurst/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – Montanans and other westerners overwhelmingly want oil and gas companies to stop operational gas leaks, according to a new poll. That puts them at odds with recent moves by the Trump administration. According to a Center for Western Priorities survey, 92 percent of Montana

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