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PNS Daily Newscast - June 25, 2019 


Conditions reported to be so bad, 300 migrant children are moved from a Texas detention center. Also on our Tuesday rundown: Sen. Susan Collins gets a challenge from Maine's House Speaker. Plus, a bill in Congress points to the need for summer meals.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health

Gov. Jay Inslee has proposed adding 800 full-time employees to Washington state's two psychiatric hospitals. (Office of the Governor/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Employees at Washington's state-owned psychiatric hospitals say there's an urgent need to boost funding for their facilities, citing growing safety concerns for staff and patients. Assaults by patients have been on the rise at both Western State and Eastern State hospitals, includi

Supporters of the so-called Cascade Care proposal are concerned Washington state lawmakers could strip it of its cost-saving potential. (Piutus/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Washington state's bid to expand health care coverage to all is in its final stages of negotiations at the Capitol. Cascade Care is Gov. Jay Inslee's proposed plan to provide affordable insurance to all Washingtonians. Bills have passed in both the House and Senate, but Ashl

In 2017, community health centers served more than a million people in Washington state. (lifewjess/Twenty20)

YAKIMA, Wash. - Thousands of medical professionals and health-care advocates from across the country are in the nation's capital this week, urging Congress to ensure stable funding for community health centers. These clinics provide affordable care to about one in 12 Americans, work in underserved a

FIT tests look for signs of blood in a person's stool  a possible sign of colorectal cancer. (Cbalentine/Wikimedia Commons)

SEATTLE — For Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, medical experts want folks to know there's an easy and non-invasive way to screen for the disease. FIT tests can be mailed to a person's home and are taken once a year. Specialists then analyze a person's stool for blood, a possible sign of th

One in five patients nationwide who go to the emergency room is hit with a surprise bill, according to a 2017 study in Health Affairs. (trvegter/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washingtonians facing a health emergency rarely have time to consider if the local hospital or doctor is in their insurance network. But they can be hit with steep bills if they aren't covered. A bill in the Washington state Legislature seeks to address this issue. One of

Raul Hidalgo, who has been taking care of his brother for more than two decades, says he must sometimes pay out of his own pocket for medical expenses. (SEIU 775)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Health-care and anti-poverty advocates are pushing for the state to fix Medicaid qualifications for folks with long-term care needs. The solution could aid seniors and people with disabilities, as well as caregivers. The change would increase the threshold at which people pay for t

Because of federal restrictions, undocumented women can't access Washington state family-planning services. (BigGirlCamera/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - A coalition is urging Washington state to expand health care. The Reproductive Health Access for All Act would help two communities in particular that face barriers to care: immigrants and the transgender or gender non-conforming communities. Women who are undocumented can't acces

Older adults are benefiting from advances in minimally invasive heart surgeries. (Kaiser Permanente)

SEATTLE – Advancements in cardiac care are giving patients and doctors a reason to celebrate this Heart Month. New methods for treating heart diseases and failure are helping folks live longer, fuller lives. Dr. Scott Haugen, program chief of cardiology at Kaiser Permanente Washington, say

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