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PNS Daily Newscast - April 19, 2019 


A look at some of the big takeaways from the release of the redacted Mueller report. Also, on our Friday rundown: Iowa recovers from devastating floods and prepares for more. And, scallopers urged to minimize the threat to seagrass.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health

Katharine Wismer (r.) is worried she might not have the savings available for long-term care. (Courtesy of Katharine Wismer)

NOTE: An earlier version of this story said advocates were in Olympia. Their meeting in the capital was canceled due to road conditions. OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washingtonians are urging lawmakers to pass legislation designed to help folks save for their care when they need it. AARP and other orga

In-home caregiver Desirae Hernandez says her recent pay raise will help ease the burden of living paycheck to paycheck. (Courtesy of Desirae Hernandez)

SEATTLE – Today marks a major achievement for Washington state caregivers in the "Fight for 15." In-home caregivers represented by Service Employees International Union Local 775 will receive their first paychecks that reflect wages of at least $15 an hour. Workers started earning the new wa

Cardiovascular diseases are preventable in 80 percent of the women who die from them. (Ike and Tash Photography)

SEATTLE – American Heart Month kicks off Friday with National Wear Red Day to raise awareness for women's heart health. Washingtonians are encouraged to wear red on Friday in solidarity with people across the country to shed light on cardiovascular diseases – the number one killer of w

Adriana Hutchings took care of her parents and grandmother for 14 years. (Courtesy of Adriana Hutchings)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – New legislation in Olympia aims to cover the growing cost of care for loved ones as they age. The Long-Term Care Trust Act would collect just over half of one percent through a payroll fee from Washington workers, to be used when they need help with daily living activities.

Prescription drugs account for nearly a quarter of Washington state's health care spending. (christinacorso/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Could 2019 be the year Washington state lawmakers tackle the rising cost of prescription drugs? State Rep. June Robinson, D-Everett, and Sen. Karen Keiser, D-Kent, are introducing bills this session that would increase transparency for drug pricing. Prescription drugs accoun

Lawmakers will introduce Gov. Jay Inslee's public-option health plan when the 2019 legislative session begins next week. (Office of the Governor)

SEATTLE - Gov. Jay Inslee has proposed a public-option health insurance plan in an effort to expand coverage to all Washingtonians. The state's Health Care Authority would contract with one or more carriers in each county to offer qualified health plans on the Washington Health Benefit Exchange. Fo

Folks can ask family members when they developed symptoms of heart disease or stroke to better prepare themselvs and future health needs. (OakleyOriginals/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Families are getting together for the holiday season, and these gatherings can be opportunities for folks to ask about their family health history. A person's chance of heart disease or stroke can increase if those afflictions run in the family. That's important to know because h

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., says domestic work makes other work possible. (U.S. House of Representatives)

SEATTLE – A National Domestic Workers Bill of Rights will be introduced in Congress next year. Among its sponsors is Rep. Pramila Jayapal, the Washington state Democrat. The bill would provide a wide range of protections for domestic workers, including labor protections and safeguards from

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