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PNS Daily Newscast - August 11, 2020 


Small business owners say postal delays make it harder to survive the pandemic; federal stimulus funding falls short for mental health treatment.


2020Talks - August 11, 2020 


Connecticut updates its election rules, and two Trump allies face off in Georgia's state runoff. Plus, a preview of next week's Democratic National Convention.

Public News Service - MO: Water

PHOTO: AmeriCorps volunteers helped construct a sandbag wall to protect Clarksville's historic downtown, but they say more needs to be done to find a long-term solution to flooding in this Mississippi River community. Photo credit: Clare Holdinghaus.

CLARKSVILLE, Mo. - A municipal decision put one historic Missouri city in danger as the Mississippi River began to rise. While volunteers stepped in to save the town, they say a permanent solution is needed to keep Clarksville's history from washing away. The Clarksville City Council said it couldn

PHOTO: More than 600 paddlers, plus hundreds more support staff and officials, will take to the water over the next several days to draw attention to water quality concerns and raise funds to preserve the Missouri River. Photo courtesy Missouri American Water

KANSAS CITY, Kan. – Paddling for a purpose. That's what more than 600 people will be doing tomorrow (Tues.) when they launch their boats in the world's largest canoe and kayak race, an event that raises money and awareness for the Missouri River. The Missouri 340 River Race is sponsored by Mi

PHOTO: Do you know what's in the water? According to a new report, millions of pounds of toxic chemicals were dumped into Missouri waterways in 2012. CREDIT: Environment Missouri.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Missouri's lakes, rivers and streams have helped shape the state's history. But a new report is warning their future could be in jeopardy, thanks to a toxic brew of chemicals. The research and policy organization Environment Missouri found that in 2012, industrial facilities d

PHOTO: Environmental groups say massive coal-ash spills, like this one in North Carolina last month, aren't the only way contaminants leak into groundwater supplies, which is why they are pushing for stricter regulation of Missouri's coal-ash disposal sites. Photo credit: Sierra Club.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Do you know what's in Missouri's groundwater? Environmental advocates say there's not enough information to answer that right now. That's why they support a resolution before the Missouri House today that would require groundwater testing at coal ash disposal sites. J

Thirty years ago, Missouri had the second highest erosion rate in the nation. The Department of Natural Resources says conservation practices save the soil. Photo courtesy of: DNR

ST. LOUIS, Mo. - The combination of last year's record drought and this year's heavy spring rains has scientists wondering if efforts to restore Missouri farmland are going to waste. Thirty years ago, Missouri had one of the worst soil-erosion rates in the nation, but conservation practices over the

Pipeyard set up by Enbridge near Amsterdam, MO      Photo Courtesy of Danny Ferguson

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The Canadian oil company that made headlines in 2010 for spilling 800,000 barrels of tar sands oil into a Michigan river now is looking to run a line across Missouri. Enbridge Energy's Flanagan South project would expand an oil pipeline 600 miles southwest from Pontiac, Ill., to

Last year the Missouri River flooded. This year it's at it's lowest level in more than 20 years. Climate change and the change in water usage makes for an uncertain future for the river, and environmentalists are urging residents to pay attention.  Photo by Robert Linder

ST. LOUIS - Last year the Missouri River flooded. This year it's at it's lowest level in more than 20 years. Climate change and changes in water use make for an uncertain future for the river, and environmentalists are urging residents to pay attention. On Wednesday the Army Corps of Engineers is

ST. LOUIS, Mo. - Sewage overflows and basement backups are serious problems for any area - but will they prompt St. Louis County voters to go to the polls on Tuesday? The upgrades to the sewer system are legally required, so the question isn't whether they'll be done, but how to pay for them. Propos

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