Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 28, 2020 


A grim milestone as U.S. COVID-19 deaths top 100,000. Housing advocates fear folks who lost their jobs could lose their homes.

2020Talks - May 27, 2020 


Republican governors in Georgia and Florida offer their states as alternatives to North Carolina, after President Trump expresses impatience about talks of a more limited Republican National Convention because of the pandemic.

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

Hispanic and African-American populations in King County make up a disproportionate number of confirmed coronavirus cases. (H_Ko/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- While cases of coronavirus are going down in Washington state, racial disparities increasingly are being laid bare. According to the Washington State Department of Health, white people are 68% of the state's population, but make up 43% of cases. Meanwhile, 13% of the state is Hispanic,

Workers at seven fruit-packing companies in the Yakima Valley are on strike. (Edgar Franks/Familias Unidas por la Justicia)

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Farm and fruit-packing workers are considered essential. And in Washington state, they're roiled in struggles for better working conditions. Yakima County is the biggest hotspot for coronavirus cases on the West Coast, and the fruit-packing warehouses in the area have been a vecto

Jose Atil is a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver, Wash., and also works at Camp Evergreen, a day care program for the children of first responders. (PSE SEIU Local 1948)

SEATTLE -- The U.S. House of Representatives has approved the next round of coronavirus relief, and some essential workers in Washington state are watching the bill closely. Jose Atil, a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver and a member of the Public School Employees of Washingt

University of Washington workers say they need more Plexiglas barriers in the hospitals. (Justin Lee/Washington Federation of State Employees)

SEATTLE -- University of Washington hospital workers are feeling vulnerable as the state inches back to normal. Custodial staff at Harborview Medical Center and UW Medical Center say they need more protective gear and safety measures in place. Paula Lukaszek, a plumber at UW and president of the Am

More cuts in spending are likely in Washington state as the financial fallout from COVID-19 continues. (Jim Bowen/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Washington state community and technical college employees fear budget cuts could be coming as COVID-19 rocks the state coffers. Already, Gov. Jay Inslee has vetoed an expected $445 million in future spending through 2023, with some of those cuts coming to education. American Federati

Some farmworkers say they've struggled to get access to protective gear to keep working safely during the pandemic. (littlewolf1989/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- Many farmworkers in Washington state say they feel left behind and in the dark in the coronavirus pandemic. Considered essential personnel, farmworkers have continued doing their jobs. But Executive Director of the farmworkers' rights group Community to Community Development Rosalinda G

Desirae Hernandez wears a homemade mask because of the lack of personal protective equipment for at-home caregivers. (Desirae Hernandez)

SEATTLE -- At-home caregivers are looking after the people most vulnerable to COVID-19 and need more protective gear to do their jobs, according to Sterling Harders, president of the caregivers' union SEIU 775. Harders says that this week Washington state agreed to put in-home caregivers -- who a

Washingtonians out of work from COVID-19 are eligible for unemployment, but should wait until at least April 18 to apply. (fabioderby/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- The coronavirus pandemic is taking a financial toll on Washington state families, but there are options to help them get through this crisis. Already, Washington is seeing record numbers of unemployment claims -- more than 300,000 first-time claims over the past two weeks. Marilyn Wat

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