PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 13, 2020 


Minutes after Biden selected Harris as VP, she throws first punch at Trump; teachers raise their hands with safety concerns.


2020Talks - August 13, 2020 


Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their first public appearance and running mates. President Trump called Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene a GOP "star," despite her support for baseless conspiracy theory QAnon.

Public News Service - WV: Environmental Justice

The disposal of low-level radioactive waste derived from Marcellus and Utica shale in Kentucky landfills is raising red flags. (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

CHARLESTON W.Va. - The paper trail of a company that dumped West Virginia radioactive frack waste into Kentucky landfills is raising serious questions. This spring, regulators cited Advanced TENORM Services for dumping the low-level radioactive waste in two municipal landfills. Not long after, the c

An environmental group will be in West Virginia this week with a thermal imaging camera to document normally invisible pollution. (Earthworks/Youtube)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Armed with a specialized thermal imaging camera, a group is traveling in the West Virginia Marcellus fields this week documenting natural gas leaks and pollution. Nadia Steinzor, eastern program coordinator for Earthworks, says the environmental group bought a forward loo

West Virginians say news of lead contamination in the drinking water of Flint, Mich., is painfully familiar. (Friends of Water)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Nearly 40 West Virginia groups are sending an open letter to the people of Flint, Michigan saying they know what it's like to have contaminated drinking water. When the news leaked that Flint's water has high levels of lead, many folks in Charleston immediately thought of the

A scorecard assembled by investor groups faults gas producers for secrecy about fracking risks. (Disclosing The Facts)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Companies fracking for gas do a poor job of informing the public, according to investor groups. Their just-released scorecard faults Chesapeake Energy for secrecy. The third annual "Disclosing The Facts" scorecard graded the largest gas producers on disclosure in areas such as w

A legal push is underway to force the EPA to close a sizable loophole in the regulation of hazardous waste from oil and gas drilling. Credit: Bill Hughes/Earthworks.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The EPA has largely failed to regulate waste from oil and gas drilling, even though the agency admitted the hazardous nature of the waste decades ago. National and state-based groups are pushing for the agency to at last close the gap. Twenty-seven years ago, the EPA decla

West Virginians will get to voice their opinions tonight in Charleston on a federal rule designed to protect streams. Credit: Trout Unlimited

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – West Virginians get to have their say tonight on surface mining's impact on streams. The federal Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) has been holding a series of public meetings around the country on a proposal known as the Stream Protection Rule

The Obama administration plan to cut emissions at coal-fired power plants would affect 11 plants in West Virginia. Conservationists are hailing the move, while the coal industry and its allies are threatening legal challenges. Photo credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – President Obama has finalized plans to reduce carbon emissions from existing power plants by 32 percent by 2030. Conservationists say the EPA's Clean Power Plan, which targets older, coal-fired plants, will have immense health benefits and boost clean energy efforts in the

PHOTO: Public health advocates, environmental groups and chemical workers' unions say an industry-backed bill, S 697, changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals, would do nothing to prevent chemical spills such as the one that brought protesters to the State Capitol last year. Photo credit: Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - An industry-backed bill changing the way the federal government regulates dangerous chemicals wouldn't do enough to protect West Virginia families, watchdogs say. The Vitter-Udall bill now being considered by a Senate committee is drawing criticism from public health advocates,

3 of 21 pages   « First  <  1 2 3 4 5 >  Last »