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PNS Daily Newscast _ March 31, 2020 


Treasury and IRS say economic impact checks for COVID-19 to begin in next three weeks. And states deal with collision of coronavirus and homelessness.

2020Talks - March 31, 2020 


During the new coronavirus pandemic, many are advocating more mail-in ballots. Some say restricting voting by mail is one method of suppressing the vote.

Public News Service - ND: Environmental Justice

A Trump administration proposal would exempt some large infrastructure projects, such as pipelines, from environmental review. (Jason Woodhead/Flickr)

BISMARCK, S.D. -- A Trump administration proposal to roll back an environmental-review law for large projects could harm North Dakota tribal communities, according to one Native American activist. The change to the 50-year-old National Environmental Policy Act would reduce the scope of environmenta

Green The Rez campaign backers want North and South Dakota to develop renewable-energy standards of 50% by 2030. (Lakota People's Law Project)

BISMARCK, N.D. — Once at the center of a pipeline fight, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is developing a green way out of reliance on fossil fuels. The Lakota People's Law Project is leading a campaign known as "Green The Rez" to create a renewable-energy blueprint for the people of Standing R

A new environmental review of the Dakota Access Pipeline is under way. (Tony Webster/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – In a significant win for the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes, a federal judge on Monday ordered greater oversight of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Citing the recent spill from the Keystone Pipeline, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ordered the U.S. Army Corps o

Oil and gas companies lose about $330 million a year to methane venting, flaring and leaking on public lands. (Tim Evanson/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Congress could decide as soon as this week the fate of the Methane and Waste Prevention Rule, and North Dakotans who see the greatest impact from this regulation are speaking up. Members of Congress are considering repealing the Bureau of Land Management rule, which limits t

Chairman Archambault (left) and Chief Arvol Looking Horse are involved in the latest fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline that also spotlights decades of racial discrimination against Native populations in North Dakota. (Photo by Jenni Monet)

BISMARCK, N.D. - For many members of the Lakota Sioux Tribe, the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline is just the latest symptom of a longstanding racial divide in North Dakota. Native Americans in the state are jailed and live in poverty at much higher rates than their white neighbors, and so

Native Americans have been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline since April. (Red Warrior Camp)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project could be permanently shut down today, pending a federal judge's decision. Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North and South Dakota are suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Tribal members say the agency issued impro

In 2014, about 200 industrial-sized garbage bags full of oil production waste were found in an abandoned gas station in Noonan, ND. (Dakota Resource Council)

BISMARCK, N.D. – After North Dakota's Health Council approved new toxic waste rules during what turned out to be an illegal public meeting last year, environmental groups are urging concerned residents to weigh in at a do-over meeting next Tuesday. Groups including the Dakota Resource Counci

The endangered pallid sturgeon is being blocked from reaching its natural breeding grounds on the Yellowstone River. (Byrd Vernon/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

BISMARCK, N. D. – Conservationists say the fate of an ancient fish species is now in the hands of the U.S. government. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation are combing through public comments about a dam project along the Yellowstone River. At issue is the Diversion

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