Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 13, 2019 


Prosecutors get approval to bring charges against former acting FBI director Andrew McCabe; and the Trump administration rolls back clean water protections.

2020Talks - September 13, 2019. (3 min.)  


At last night's debate, Democrats try for breakout moments; former VP Joe Biden spats with Sen. Bernie Sanders and former HUD Secretary Julián Castro.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AR: Rural/Farming

Harmful blue-green algae is increasing in bodies of water across the country because of climate change, farming practices and storm and wastewater runoff. (USGS)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Algal blooms in bodies of water across the nation are increasing as a result of climate change, farming practices, storm and wastewater runoff and other environmental issues. They're naturally occurring, but produce toxins that get into the air, water or food, and can cau

Rice is Arkansas' number one crop, and opening up trade with Cuba could mean a boost to the state's economy. (USDA)

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - Human-rights issues and free elections continue to be at the forefront of the United States' tentatively renewed relationship with Cuba. President Obama visited the country recently and has taken some steps toward lifting the trade embargo, but that would need congressional appr

Deputy USDA Secretary Krysta Harden was among those leading a trade mission to Ghana, where the agency signed agreements worth $58 million over the next five years. Courtesy: USDA

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Farmers from Arkansas and other states could be pitching in to help others half a world away, as part of new agreements forged by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The USDA just hosted a trade mission to Ghana, which included announcing some "Food for Progress" agreements to

PHOTO: Conservationists want people to connect to the Buffalo River, because they say that will help protect it. Picture courtesy of thecitywire.com

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Faced with possible contamination from a huge confined hog feeding operation, fans of the Buffalo River are bringing attention to the waterway in order to protect it. On Tuesday, the National Parks Conservation Association and others will take members of the media for a fl

Researchers say they are concerned about chemicals in the natural brine that comes out of gas fracking wells. DIAGRAM by the EPA.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Many Arkansans are concerned about the fluids natural-gas drillers pump underground for hydraulic fracturing. But researchers say naturally occurring chemicals, some radioactive, coming out of the wells may be more of an issue. Avner Vengosh, a professor of geochemistry

According to the National Priorities Project, many huge congressional spending battles including one now going on over the farm bill, could be settled by closing corporate tax loopholes. GRAPH by the NPP, based on OMB and CBO figures.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - One of the key budget issues keeping the Farm Bill stuck in congressional gridlock could be solved by closing a single tax loophole, according to budget analysts. Federal agriculture programs are on the verge of expiring, which could cause serious problems for Arkansas's farmers.

Growers' Gift Spaghetti Sauce is made of ingredients gleaned from Arkansas farms, and it's being sold to support gathering produce for the state's hungry. PHOTO from the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - Arkansas farmers and the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance are gleaning and cooking to feed the hungry. Gleaning is a practice that dates back to the Bible, in which farmers let people go into the fields after a harvest and gather left-behind food for the poor. There is so much d

GRAPHIC Federal supports for farmers' markets can have a big impact at a tiny cost, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. Courtesy of the UCS.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Advocates for tiny federal programs for farmers' markets say they could grow big results for Arkansas farmers, communities, seniors and low-income families – if Congress would pass a farm bill. Jeffrey O'Hara, an economist with the Union of Concerned Scientists who

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