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PNS Daily Newscast - December 13, 2018 


Trump fixer Michael Cohen gets three years, and Trump calls him a liar. Also on the Thursday rundown: higher smoking rates causing some states to fall in health rankings; and the Farm Bill helps wilderness areas.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Toxics

More than one in four deaths of children under 5 years of age can be linked to unhealthy environments. (nih.gov)

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – How the environment impacts the health of Americans has long been a heated topic of discussion, and an expert on the subject says the federal government isn't doing enough research on pollution or taking enough action to prevent children from being exposed to it. Lawrence

About 70 percent of parents and caregivers admit they've stored medications where children can see them. (cdc.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — Every nine minutes in this country, a child under the age of six has to go to the emergency room because of accidental medication poisoning - and every twelve days, the incident is fatal. The Indiana Poison Center receives about 60,000 calls for help a year. March 18-24 is Poi

Advocates are asking for more oversight of confined animal feeding operations. (hecweb.org)

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana lawmakers will consider several bills that are important to the environment this legislative session. They cover solar, state forests, safe drinking water and factory-farm pollution. Tim Maloney, senior policy director with the Hoosier Environmental Council, said there

Plastic waste is broken down by currents and sunlight and is often ingested by wildlife. (usgs.gov)

MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. – Clean-water advocates say they’re are hoping 2018 will be a year of better water quality in the Great Lakes and oceans. Carolyn Box, science program director at 5 Gyres, warns that by the year 2050, there will be more plastic in the water than fish, with 95 percen

A panel is taking public testimony to determine if legislation is needed to regulate factory farms. (usda.gov)

INDIANAPOLIS — The question of what to do about runoff from concentrated animal-feeding operations, known as CAFOs, continues to be a topic of debate in Indiana. Environmental groups and farming activists have clashed over how much regulation the industry needs, and a public hearing on the top

Coal ash from the bottom of the Dan River near the site of Duke Energy's spill. (Sierra Club)

INDIANAPOLIS — Duke Energy has a plan to dispose of millions of gallons of coal ash waste, but environmental groups are asking policy makers to reject it, saying it poses a health hazard. Indiana is requiring Duke to prepare closure plans for 20 coal ash lagoons, many of which are leaking an

Environmental groups say Indiana waterways polluted by runoff from factory farms are just one reason they're pushing for tougher regulations. (hec.org)

INDIANAPOLIS -- Environmental groups in Indiana have spent years filing lawsuits and sponsoring legislation against factory farms. Now, they're switching gears. The groups say their current focus is on educating community members about the health risks associated with confined animal feeding proce

Free blood testing is being offered to more than 1,000 people being moved out of a housing complex because of toxic soil around their homes. (epa.gov)

EAST CHICAGO, Ind. – Clinics are being offered for East Chicago residents affected by contaminated soil from an old lead and smelting plant. More than 1,000 mostly low-income people have been told they'll have to move because of toxic levels of lead and arsenic in the soil around their homes

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