Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 13, 2019 


Prosecutors get approval to bring charges against former acting FBI director Andrew McCabe; and the Trump administration rolls back clean water protections.

2020Talks - September 13, 2019. (3 min.)  


At last night's debate, Democrats try for breakout moments; former VP Joe Biden spats with Sen. Bernie Sanders and former HUD Secretary Julián Castro.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - IN: Toxics

A petcoke ship docked on Chicago's southeast side. (Natural Resources Defense Council)

INDIANAPOLIS - Tons of oil-refining waste known as petcoke is on the move from Indiana across the country, and the Natural Resources Defense Council is watching. The group worked with people who live along the Calumet River in South Chicago, Ill., to keep a BP facility in Whiting, Ind., from dumping

More than 67,000 Hoosiers have signed petitions supporting the Clean Power Plan. Credit: clarita/morguefile.com

INDIANAPOLIS - Doctors and pastors, economists and environmentalists - people all across Indiana - are applauding the first-ever national protections from carbon pollution - and they're calling on the state's elected leaders to get behind the Clean Power Plan. Dr. Stephen Jay said that during his c

PHOTO: This summer an Indiana General Assembly interim study committee will examine policies regarding smoking bans, and other tobacco-related matters impacting Hoosiers' health. Photo credit: Pedro J. Perez/Morguefile.

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana's public smoking ban has been on the books for three years, and this summer legislators will explore the law's benefits to determine whether it can be expanded. When the law was passed, it exempted certain bars, taverns, private clubs and casinos. Brianna Herndon, India

GRAPHIC: The U.S. Supreme Court delayed a rule to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, although they let the rule stand while the EPA rewrites a portion of it. Mercury emissions typically enter the food chain through waterways. Graphic courtesy of the National Park Service.

INDIANAPOLIS – Critics say it's a win, and so do supporters. The U.S. Supreme Court decision on the EPA Mercury and Air Toxics Standards means the agency will have to go back to the drawing board on the rule, but the rule still stands in Indiana – at least for now. Earthjustice staff at

PHOTO: With warm temperatures and plenty of sunlight, summer is prime time for the spread of blue-green algae that can threaten the health of Indiana's lakes and reservoirs. Photo credit: Willem van Aken, CSIRO/Wikimedia.

INDIANAPOLIS – With summer getting underway, experts say blue-green algae fueled by nutrient pollution are certain to return to lakes and streams in Indiana. Kim Ferraro, water and agriculture policy director with the Hoosier Environmental Council, says while some forms of algae are good for

PHOTO: At IU-Bloomington, Assistant Professor Adam Ward, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, says new research on growth hormones used in beef production may demonstrate gaps in regulating hazardous substances. Photo courtesy of IU Bloomington.

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Research on hormones used in animal agriculture underscores possible weaknesses in how hazardous substances are regulated in the United States, according to an Indiana environmental scientist. Adam Ward, an assistant professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at

PHOTO: With the support of a bipartisan group of lawmakers, including Sen. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, the U.S. Senate is considering controversial legislation to update the Toxic Substances Control Act. Photo credit: Wally Gobetz/Flickr.

INDIANAPOLIS - The U.S. Senate is considering an update of the nearly 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act, which regulates the use of chemicals in consumer products. Supporters claim Senate Bill 697 would improve regulation, but opponents argue that the devil is in the details. While the bill

PHOTO: Senate Bill 312 would require reporting of all above-ground tanks storing toxic chemicals that are close to sources of surface-level drinking water in Indiana. Photo credit: Gnangarra/Wikimedia.

INDIANAPOLIS – A West Virginia chemical spill that contaminated the drinking-water source for 300,000 people last year is serving as a cautionary tale in Indiana. Supporters of Senate Bill 312 say it would help prevent a similar environmental disaster in Indiana by protecting drinking-water s

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