Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - KY: Criminal Justice

Protests surged over the weekend in multiple U.S. cities over several high-profile cases involving the killing of black citizens by police.(Adobe Stock)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Protests in Louisville and Lexington over the weekend highlight growing public frustration with a system that offers little accountability to those in power. The killings of unarmed black citizens across the country, including Breonna Taylor, who was asleep at her home in Louisv

Juvenile-court officials say school closures because of the coronavirus pandemic have contributed to the nationwide drop in youth arrests and detention. (Adobe Stock)

COVINGTON, Ky. -- Juvenile courts report arrests of young people have dropped since the coronavirus pandemic began. Data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation show the number of kids in local youth detention centers across thirty states dipped by 24% in March alone. Children's Law Center of Kentucky

Common practices to stop the spread of COVID-19 are nearly impossible to enact among incarcerated populations. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- While most of the country practices frequent handwashing and social distancing, prisons and jails are housing people that can't take basic precautions against contracting the coronavirus or giving it to others. Tyrone Walker, associate at the Justice Policy Institute, said most f

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, nearly 2 million people with mental illnesses are booked into jails each year. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Kentucky lawmakers are considering a bill that would prevent seriously mentally ill defendants from receiving the death penalty. A handful of other states, including Ohio, Virginia and Indiana, recently have pushed similar legislation. Patrick Delahanty, director of advocacy fo

There are currently 31 people on death row in Kentucky prisons. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Use of the death penalty is disappearing from entire sections of the United States, and eroding in others. That's according to data from the Death Penalty Information Center. The center's Executive Director Robert Dunham says not only have executions declined by 75%, but dea

  The United States Penitentiary Big Sandy, located near Inez, Ky., has a prison population of about 1,300 men. (Roger May)

By Alison Stine Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan Reporting for the YES! Media-Kentucky News Connection Collaboration WHITESBURG, Ky. – Big Sandy hides on a big hill. If you’re not looking for the federal prison, you’ll miss it easily. At first, all that can be seen above the s

Kentucky spends about $10 million annually on death-penalty court proceedings, according to the state's Department of Public Advocacy. (Adobe Stock)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A Franklin County judge has ruled the state's protocol for carrying out the death penalty is unconstitutional. The ruling by Judge Phillip Shepherd came in response to a case filed by a group of death-row inmates, who argued corrections department regulations don't protect peo

Letcher County residents and environmental groups have stopped the building of a proposed $510 million prison on reclaimed land. (Adobe Stock)

WHITESBURG, Ky. — Local activists in Letcher County have forced the Federal Bureau of Prisons to withdraw its intent to construct a new $510 million federal prison on a former coal mine site. Spearheaded by Rep. Hal Rogers, the facility would have been the fourth federal prison to be built i

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