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PNS Daily Newscast - May 25, 2018 


President Trump scraps planned talks with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Also on our Friday rundown: California lawmakers support and emergency hotline for foster kids; and boating is a booming business in states like Minnesota.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MA: Poverty Issues

Some lower-income students would rather skip lunch than go to the cafeteria and be lectured or denied a hot meal because their parents owe the school money. (Wokandapix/Pixabay)

BOSTON – A cold sandwich is what students may get instead of the hot lunch they wanted at some Massachusetts public schools. They often are humiliated, sometimes to tears, when denied their lunch, and some are even confronted about their parents' debt by cafeteria workers. State Sen. Cynthia

As many as 1 in 10 current or recent college students face homelessness as they struggle to pay student debt and living expenses, research shows. (andrew_t8/Pixabay)

BOSTON – Studying while hungry – many college students struggle to get enough to eat because they lack money to buy food. At Worcester State University on Friday, educators and policymakers floated solutions at the Voices of Hunger conference. Research from Temple University found ab

Airport workers say JetBlue subcontractors have intimidated them for organizing. (BonnieHenderson/Pixabay)

BOSTON – Hundreds of workers at Logan International Airport went out on strike Wednesday afternoon, demanding fair treatment by subcontractors for JetBlue. With about 2,500 subcontracted workers at the airport, the strike is being called one of the biggest worker-led actions at Logan in year

Students who spend more than 20 hours a week at a job are less likely to graduate. (StartupStockPhotos/Pixabay)

BOSTON – A new study from the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center says raising the minimum wage has little impact on teen unemployment, but can have a big impact on teens and their families. On Monday, 18 states saw their minimum wages increase, but Massachusetts wasn't among them. A bi

Without an individual mandate, insurance premiums can skyrocket for those who need it most. (TheShiv76/Pixabay)

BOSTON – The federal tax legislation ends the requirement that everyone have health insurance or pay a penalty, but in Massachusetts, that requirement remains in effect. The federal Affordable Care Act was modeled on the Bay State's health-insurance law, including the individual mandate. Bri

Family leave would let workers take off up to 16 weeks to care for a new baby or sick relative. (smpratt90/Pixabay)

BOSTON -- Community organizers say they have twice the number of signatures they need to put paid family leave and a $15 minimum wage on next year's state ballot. The grassroots effort gathered almost 275,000 signatures from 346 of the 351 towns and cities in Massachusetts. Andrew Farnitano with

The state's poverty rate is almost back to pre-Great Recession levels, thanks in part to the $2 increase in the state minimum wage. (Wonderlane/flckr)

BOSTON – It's a significant drop. The share of Massachusetts children living in poverty is down, and state job growth along with recent boosts in the minimum wage are cited as big factors pushing the positive trend. The data from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey show the child p

High-quality public education and health care are two factors that place Massachusetts in the top three states nationwide for child well-being. (M. Clifford)

BOSTON – The kids are all right in the Bay State, according to a new report. The state ranks second in the nation for overall child well-being. The new Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book examines economic, education, health, family and community factors that affect kids. M

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