Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 24, 2020 


The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump continues; and KY lawmakers press ahead on requiring photo IDs for voters.

2020Talks - January 24, 2020 


Businessman Tom Steyer and former NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the two billionaires in the Democratic primary, have spent far more than the rest of the Democratic hopefuls combined. But Steyer also uses grassroots tactics. What do other candidates and voters think about the influence of money in elections?

Public News Service - PA: Livable Wages/Working Families

Workers rallied outside Sen. Pat Toomey's Pittsburgh office calling for an end to the government shutdown. (32BJ SEIU)

PITTSBURGH - Unionized workers say everyone will suffer consequences from the longest government shutdown in history, and that some of those out of work will never be paid. Members of SEIU Local 32-BJ rallied outside the Pittsburgh office of Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., on Tuesday, demanding that he sup

Construction workers frequently are misclassified as independent contractors, according to a new report. (skeeze/pixabay)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Unscrupulous contractors in southeast Pennsylvania routinely are violating labor laws and victimizing customers, including state and local government, according to a new report. The report from the Keystone Research Center found many contractors in the regional Philadelphia

In 2017, SNAP benefits kept 3.4 million Americans out of poverty. (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture/Flickr)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – After failing to get deep cuts to nutrition assistance through Congress, President Donald Trump wants to get them by changing the rules. Trump had backed a Republican plan that critics warned would have ended SNAP or food-stamp benefits for two million Americans and school

More than 12 percent of Pennsylvania households have difficulty affording food. (USN/wikimedia commons)

HARRISBURG, Pa. — More than 1.5 million Pennsylvanians still live in poverty, and another 3.5 million are near-poor according to a new report. The Pennsylvania Poverty Snapshot, released by the Coalition for Low-Income Pennsylvanians, and the Coalition on Human Needs, showed a slight decreas

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto joined union organizers and workers to announce the contract agreement. (32BJ SEIU)

PITTSBURGH – Security officers in Pittsburgh are celebrating a new contract that, for many, almost doubles the pay and benefits they were getting just a few years ago. The agreement, announced in Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto's conference room on Tuesday, covers more than 1,100 workers who pro

Security officers in Pittsburgh are negotiating with 14 companies for a new contract. (32BJ SEIU)

PITTSBURGH – Gov. Tom Wolf is standing with security officers in Pittsburgh Thursday as they rally for $15 an hour in their next contract. Just a little more than three years ago, security officers in the city were paid as little as $7.50 an hour. But more than 1,000 joined Service Employe

Since 1973, the top 1 percent's income has grown nine times faster than for the bottom 99 percent. (pxhere)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Since 1973, almost 46 percent of overall income growth in Pennsylvania has gone to the top one percent of earners, according to a new report. The report, entitled "The New Gilded Age", looks at the income gap in every county in every state. It found that Pennsylvania ranks as

Many small businesses in Pennsylvania say they don't offer employee retirement plans because they are too costly. (jarmoluk/Pixabay)

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Pennsylvania small business owners are concerned that their workers aren't saving for retirement, according to a new poll by AARP of Pennsylvania. And the poll shows, the business owners think the state should help. Nationally, only 1 in 20 workers opens a private retireme

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