Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 22, 2018 


GOP leadership puts its efforts to fix immigration on hold. Also on the Friday rundown: Florida students take their gun control message to the Midwest; and a call for renewal of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Salmon Recovery

PHOTO: It's been 20 years since the Northwest Forest Plan was adopted to manage national forestland in Washington, Oregon and northern California. Now, the U.S. Forest Service wants public comments on what the future of the plan should be. Photo credit: Binkski/FeaturePics.com

SEATTLE - The U.S. Forest Service holds public meetings this week in Seattle and Portland, asking for comments on how to update the Northwest Forest Plan. The plan has been the overarching management strategy to balance conservation and timber harvest on national forestland in the Northwest for 20

PHOTO: A side of toxins with that? Groups critical of Washington's proposal to update water-quality standards claim it doesn't do enough to clean up pollution or curtail industrial waste discharge, while health warnings persist for eating fish caught in some locations. Photo credit: JRStock/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. - People can comment starting this week on new state water quality standards that already have been years in the making in Washington. Anyone who eats or catches fish will want to take a look at them. The new standards are based on higher fish consumption rates that are more realisti

PHOTO: This tiny sturgeon fry could grow up to be 5 to 6 feet in length, and can live for 70 years or more. This weekend's Columbia River Sturgeon Festival in Vancouver, Wash. pays tribute to this prehistoric fish species. Photo courtesy Wash. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Salmon get the lion's share of attention in the Pacific Northwest, but a festival this weekend in Vancouver calls attention to another fascinating fish species. The sturgeon may not be considered beautiful or iconic, but like salmon, it also requires careful management by

PHOTO: People who shared their reasons for supporting Wild Olympics legislation with reporters on Thursday included, from left, Michelle Sandoval (Port Townsend), Sen. Patty Murray, Rep. Derek Kilmer, Tim McNulty (Sequim), and Bill Taylor (Shelton). Photo credit: Thomas O'Keefe.

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash. - A push to add new wilderness acreage to Olympic National Forest gained some momentum Thursday, as members of Congress invited supporters and reporters to the area for an update on the legislation. The "Wild Olympics Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers Act" lost some steam w

PHOTO: Washington's favorite entree is one reason Gov. Jay Inslee has proposed an update to the state's water quality laws. But commercial fishing and water-keepers' groups are already in court asking the EPA to step in. Photo credit: gbh007/iStockphoto.com.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Gov. Jay Inslee is proposing an update to the state's water quality rules. On its surface, it sounds like good news for fans of Northwest-caught seafood. But commercial fishermen and four 'water-keeper' organizations are saying it's too little, too late. They're in federal court, a

PHOTO: Debris and chemical residue end up in storm drains and are carried into local waterways, affecting fish and drinking water. After three years, Clark County has agreed to comply with the federal Clean Water Act to minimize storm-water runoff. Photo credit: iStockphoto.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The year's end also marks the end of a three-year court battle over water quality standards for Clark County – and all sides are calling it a win. This week, Clark County commissioners settled the penalty phase of a lawsuit to bring the county into compliance with the

PHOTO: Will the fourth federal plan to save endangered salmon species make headway? Its critics say it isn't much different than earlier plans that were found lacking. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.

SEATTLE - Another deadline is approaching in the lengthy court battle to protect endangered Northwest wild salmon species, and this week the federal government has done its part to meet it by submitting a draft version of an updated plan. However, conservation and fishing groups say there's nothing

PHOTO: Divers Crayton Fenn and Eric Hazelton with their most recent

SEATTLE - Puget Sound may have a lot of problems in terms of pollution, but a cure is well under way for one of them. In the last year, about 200 lost or abandoned fishing nets have been rounded up by teams of expert divers. It's slow going, because it is no small task to locate the nets by sonar an

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