Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 20, 2019 


The Trump administration finalizes a coal-friendly emissions rule for power plants. Also on today's rundown: A new development in the debate over the 2020 Census citizenship question; and why "Juneteenth" is an encore celebration in Florida and other states.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environmental Justice

PHOTO: The cargo-shipping business is booming at the Port of Seattle, prompting some to ask why the port needs to open its Terminal 5 to a company that repairs oil rigs. Photo courtesy Port of Seattle.

SEATTLE - Port of Seattle commissioners will appeal a Seattle Department of Planning and Development finding against a Shell Oil contractor leasing Terminal 5 as its homeport for repairing oil rigs on their way to Alaska. But late Tuesday, port commissioners also voted to warn the contractor that it

PHOTO: Members of the Swinomish Tribe, seen here at a tribal ceremony, are concerned that long trains of oil tank cars are crossing their reservation every week, a development the Tribe says violates its 1991 easement agreement with a rail company. Photo credit: Leslie Dierauf/U.S. Geological Survey.

SEATTLE - A Native American tribe says too many trains, some of which carry volatile Bakken crude, are crossing its reservation and it's suing the rail company to stop them. The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community alleges BNSF Railway is violating an easement agreement made in 1991. The agreement se

PHOTO: The Washington Legislature is considering ways to help regional utilities end their use of power from the Colstrip Generating Station in Montana. Environmental groups want a timeline for the transition and protections for ratepayers. Photo copyright Paul K. Anderson; used with his permission.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Environmental advocates from across the state made their way to Olympia on Wednesday to underscore what they say is the need to make more definite plans for Washington utilities to stop using coal power generated out-of-state. A bill that passed in the Washington Senate (SB 5

PHOTO: An aerial view of Terminal Five at the Port of Seattle shows the location at the heart of a lawsuit filed on Monday to stop oil drilling ships from being docked and repaired in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of the Port of Seattle.

SEATTLE - It's turning out to be a big week for oil transport issues in Washington. On Monday, four conservation groups filed a lawsuit in King County Superior Court, challenging the Port of Seattle's decision to allow oil drilling ships to be housed and repaired at the port's Terminal Five. Becky

PHOTO: Some Washingtonians say oil-train disasters such as the one in West Virginia this month, in which 27 of 109 rail cars full of Bakken crude oil derailed, can only be avoided if the trains aren't allowed in the Northwest. Photo courtesy Office of West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin.

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. - Last weekend's oil train derailments and explosions in West Virginia and Ontario are having reverberations on the Washington coast. On Monday, the Skagit County Hearing Examiner determined that an expansion plan to allow the Shell oil refinery in northwest Washington to accept

PHOTO: The Colstrip Generating Station in Montana has been under regional scrutiny for years for air and water pollution. Three Washington utilities use some of its power, and have proposed legislation to retire the plant. Photo courtesy Montana Environmental Information Center.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - A coal-fired power plant in Montana is at the heart of legislation getting its first committee hearings this week in Olympia. The Colstrip Generating Station provides some electricity for three Washington utilities, which are proposing a plan to retire the plant. Colstrip already i

PHOTO: A side of toxins with that? Groups critical of Washington's proposal to update water-quality standards claim it doesn't do enough to clean up pollution or curtail industrial waste discharge, while health warnings persist for eating fish caught in some locations. Photo credit: JRStock/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. - People can comment starting this week on new state water quality standards that already have been years in the making in Washington. Anyone who eats or catches fish will want to take a look at them. The new standards are based on higher fish consumption rates that are more realisti

PHOTO: Montana's Colstrip Generating Facility is owned in part by electric utilities serving Washington customers. Environmental groups say those ratepayers are on the hook for costs related to the plant's massive coal ash waste ponds. Photo credit: David T. Hanson for Montana Environmental Information Center.

SEATTLE - Many Washington homes and businesses use power generated by burning coal, although the power plants aren't located in the state. A new report from the Sierra Club and Earthjustice focuses on coal ash waste and the trouble it is causing - not only for the environment, but for ratepayers. I

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