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PNS Daily Newscast - Friday, August 23, 2019 


A federal court ruling changes how the President is elected, and Florida Democrats trigger a special session vote on guns. Those stories and more in today's news.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Youth

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee was the first presidential candidate to call for a climate-focused debate. (International Institute for Sustainable Development/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Young people are leading the growing calls for the Democratic National Committee to allow a presidential primary debate on climate change. DNC officials so far have resisted the stand alone debate, saying they would have to hold other single issue contests as well. But supporters

Summer learning could help close the achievement gap for low-income students who typically don't have access to summer programs. (Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas)

SEATTLE — It's Summer Learning Week, a celebration of the importance of education while school is out. Programs across Washington state are dedicated to helping kids avoid the effects of summer learning loss, which can leave some students behind at the beginning of the next academic year. E

Families spend about $300 more each month on meals during the summer, compared with their food costs during the school year. (Aleksei Potov/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE — While summer provides a break from school, it also can be a season of hunger for some kids. A bill in Congress could help address this issue. Congressman Rick Larsen, D-Wash., is co-sponsoring the Summer Meals Act of 2019 to better integrate summer education and meals programs and

The Annie E. Casey Foundation places Washington state 29th in education in its annual report. (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

SEATTLE – Washington state still has more progress to make on child well-being, according to a new report. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2019 KIDS COUNT Data Book ranks the Evergreen State 16th overall in its measure of how children are doing in four categories: economic well-being, educat

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends school-age children have no more than two hours of screen time a day. (JackF/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – Sunny days are upon the Northwest, but some parents may be finding it difficult to entice their children away from video screens. Dr. Susanna Block, a pediatrician with Kaiser Permanente, notes that too much time in front of a TV, on the phone or at a computer is linked to a number

Washington state students walked away from financial reality fairs with a new appreciation for their parents. (Kalani/Adobe Stock)

RICHLAND, Wash. — Northwest credit unions are giving high school students a taste of real-world budgeting. About 800 Washington state high school students attended financial reality fairs sponsored by local credit unions across the state this year, providing young people a crash course in mana

One in 10 eighth graders tried e-cigarettes in 2018, according to a Washington state survey. (aleksandr_yu/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – With the number of teenagers who use e-cigarettes rising, what can parents do to stop the trend? According to the 2018 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey, 30% of 12th graders in the state used vaping products, up from 20% in 2016. Dr. Susanna Block, a pediatrician with Kaiser

A federal grant program funds after-school and summer opportunities such as this one in White Salmon for nearly 18,000 Washington kids. (School's Out Washington)

SEATTLE — For the third year in a row, the Trump administration has proposed eliminating funding for after-school and summer-learning programs. President Donald Trump's proposed 2020 budget cuts funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program by $1.2 billion. In the past, Tru

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