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PNS Daily Newscast - October 19, 2018 


Senator Corker demands the Trump administration share intelligence on the killing of a Washington Post columnist. Also on the Friday rundown: groups sue over the Texas border wall plan; and the soggy summer in some states may lead to higher pumpkin prices for Halloween.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Health Issues

Before the state expanded Medicaid, rural West Virginians were much less likely to have health insurance than their urban peers. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A new report says expanding Medicaid is really paying off for rural West Virginians. Rural areas typically have real disadvantages – higher unemployment and poverty, fewer doctors and in some cases, financially strapped hospitals. But Kelli Caseman, director of Ch

South Charleston firefighters say they are called out to revive people who have overdosed nearly every day now. (SCFD)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A South Charleston firefighter says they're getting opioid overdose calls nearly every day. But, he said they have no place to send survivors who want to get clean. People in the trenches of the opioid battle have long said the state lacks enough long-term, residential su

The U.S. Energy Information Agency sees little boost to West Virginia coal production from ending the Clean Power Plan. (U.S. EIA)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – President Donald Trump's visit to Charleston on Tuesday highlighted a plan to loosen carbon-pollution rules - but according to the federal government's own figures, that isn't likely to spark much growth in coal jobs. Trump's plan would let states, instead of the Environm

Bill Flanigan has given up running for office and has become a hemp farmer. (Bill Flanigan/Youtube/Morgantown Chamber of Commerce)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — A former West Virginia lawmaker who spoke movingly about being helped by medical marijuana now says he has given up on politics, but not cannabis. In 2016, Bill Flanigan was a member of the House of Delegates, newly appointed to an open seat in Morgantown. His first spee

Julie Warden of Charleston, far left, spoke at a press conference supporting the Affordable Care Act last week. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -– For many of the West Virginians with chronic medical conditions, insurance regulation means freedom. But Republicans lawmakers who oppose the Affordable Care Act say Obamacare’s insurance rules limit commercial freedom. For communications professional Julie Warden

As it stands, there are no serious proposals before West Virginia lawmakers on how to deal with insurance rules over pre-existing conditions. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Some West Virginians with chronic illnesses are dreading a federal lawsuit over the rule that insurance companies have to cover pre-existing medical conditions. The suit was filed by the attorney general of Texas, but the U.S. Department of Justice and West Virginia attor

Advocates say there are probably tens of thousands of West Virginians waiting for the state's medical cannabis program to get under way. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Stats from states that have legalized medical marijuana suggest legal weed could be a big help to West Virginia's strained Public Employees Insurance Agency. Striking teachers recently demanded better funding for their health insurance. And by one estimate, a working medi

Initial research found higher levels of cancer and birth defects in residents around surface mines, but a broad federal study to follow up on those problems was canceled. (Vivian Stockman/Southwings)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – New evidence suggests political pressure had a role in the U.S. Department of the Interior's sudden cancellation of a major study on the health impacts of mountaintop-removal mining. According to a newly released Inspector General's letter to Congress, the Interior Depar

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