Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 14, 2019 


Hundreds of companies urge Trump to resolve tariff dispute with China. Also on our Friday rundown: California moves closer to universal health coverage. Plus, new Gulf restoration projects – a decade after the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Hunger/Food/Nutrition

Stroke is the sixth-leading cause of death in Washington state. (cameravit/Adobe Stock)

TACOMA, Wash. — May is American Stroke Month, and a few tips can help people lower their chances of having a stroke. According to the American Heart Association, up to 80% of strokes are preventable, and a healthy lifestyle can go a long way. Dr. Dennis Wang is the medical director of stroke

Farmworkers will discuss workplace retaliation and health hazards from pesticide use at the Farmworker Tribunal in Olympia on Monday. (Community to Community Development)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Farmworkers will be in Olympia next week to discuss workplace conditions. For the sixth year, laborers from across the state of Washington will deliver testimonies to tribunal judges in culturally appropriate ways - through stories and in the language they feel comfortable speaking

Food banks in Washington state are filling the gap for everyone from federal employees to small business owners in communities outside national parks. (Paul Joseph Brown/Northwest Harvest)

SEATTLE – Food banks across the state are feeling the stress as the government shutdown brings more people through their doors. Thomas Reynolds is the CEO of Northwest Harvest, which distributes to a network of 375 food banks statewide. As an example of the strain, he notes the White Center

Free summer meal programs are helping working families, who spend an extra $300 on food when school is out. (School's Out Washington)

SEATTLE – Summer break is approaching in Washington state, which also means many families can't rely on school for a meal during the day. Schools and summer programs will be stepping up to fill the gap with free summer meals. Marci Asher is the executive director of the Urban Family Center i

About 25 percent of the calories consumed globally come from rice, which is under threat from rising carbon dioxide levels. (Calmuziclover/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Rice is an important source of nutrients for billions of people around the world, but it could lose some of its key health benefits as carbon dioxide levels continue to rise. Researchers found rice is sapped of essential B vitamins when concentrations of the most common greenhouse

WSU researchers have developed a micro-particle they say can be fed to bees to help them withstand exposure to pesticides. (Photo courtesy of Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman.)

PULLMAN, Wash. – Two Washington State University researchers have been recognized for their development of a food supplement that helps bee colonies survive the toxic effects of pesticides. Brandon Hopkins and Waled Suliman developed a carbon micro-particle beekeepers can add to meals that r

One of the farmers involved in the Photovoice project, Anna Caruso of Caruso Farms, says she takes care of the land to produce food for people, but also for her children. (Anna Caruso)

SNOHOMISH, Wash. – A new project captures the issues facing agriculture in Snohomish County through the farmer's lens - literally. Seven farmers took part in the Photovoice project hosted by the Snohomish Conservation District and the Nature Conservancy, snapping photos that expressed the im

Bees are important pollinators for plants and flowers, but in the past year, populations nationwide have dropped by one-third. (Andreas/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Today is the final day for the public to comment on an updated assessment of four pesticides that environmental and food-safety groups worry are killing off bees. Hundreds of thousands of public comments are being delivered to EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C., today by Friends

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