Newscasts

PBS Daily Newscast - July 8, 2020 


Mary Trump's book labels our president a reckless leader who paid a pal to take his SAT test; Nevada lawmakers meet to address pandemic shortfall.

2020Talks - July 8, 2020 


The Movement for Black Lives announces a new proposal to overhaul policing and invest in Black communities; NJ and DE have primary elections today; and some political candidates join in a Facebook advertising boycott.

Public News Service - WA: Native American

PHOTO: Ariel view of Grays Harbor. Photo Credit: Quinault Indian Nation

SEATTLE - Tens of millions of barrels a year: that's how much crude oil is projected to be rolling by rail to Washington state under a proposal that's being challenged by local tribes and community groups. According to Tyson Johnston, First Councilman with the Quinault Indian Nation, his tribe wan

GRAPHIC: NOAA is reaching out to stakeholders in what could signal a more collaborative approach to saving endangered Northwest salmon and steelhead. But can they all swim in the same direction?

SEATTLE - The federal agency in charge of making plans for salmon recovery in the Pacific Northwest is reaching out to a couple hundred people, businesses and associations, in what could signal a more collaborative approach to saving the endangered fish. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis

PHOTO: The Black Thunder coal mine is located in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. Photo courtesy of Ecoflight.

SPOKANE, Wash. - A packed house is expected Tuesday at the Spokane County Fairgrounds for a hearing about a coal terminal planned for western Washington, near Bellingham. Some concerned citizens coming to add their comments do not live anywhere near the terminal, or even in Washington, including mem

PHOTO: Sockeye salmon in Redfish Lake. Photo credit: Neil Ever Osborne/Save Our Wild Salmon.

SEATTLE - Federal agencies, conservation groups, fishermen and sportsmen, Native American tribes and dam managers have rarely all been in the same room - unless it's a courtroom - in the long battle over how to restore native salmon and steelhead populations in the Northwest. However, one leader i

SEATTLE - The U.S. House of Representatives late Tuesday voted to ease rules for Border Patrol agents, and the measure is causing concern among sportsmen, Native Americans and other advocates for public land. Supporters say the measure will protect the country from illegal activity such as drug smu

SEATTLE - Washington fishermen and sportsmen are expected to crowd a hearing in Seattle today to consider an area 1,600 miles away - Alaska's Bristol Bay - and voice concerns about a proposal for what would be the largest open-pit mine in North America. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) say

SEATTLE - An estimated 87,000 children in Washington live in areas where at least 30 percent of their neighbors are poor, and that affects them negatively in a variety of ways. This and other findings are in a KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The report say

WHITE SALMON, Wash. - This fall marks a river renaissance for Washington, according to advocates for native salmon and outdoor recreation. A hole is being blasted into the base of southern Washington's Condit Dam today, and Northwestern Lake - the reservoir behind it - is expected to drain in just

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