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PNS Daily Newscast - September 18, 2020 


A federal judge slams the brakes on U.S. Postal Service changes nationwide; and we take you to the state 'out front' for clean elections.


2020Talks - September 18, 2020 


Trump slams the 1619 project on Constitution Day, and Pennsylvania's Supreme Court makes some election changes.

Public News Service - WV: Youth

West Virginia is looking for more federal funding to support the shift to online learning in schools. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. -- Even before the coronavirus pandemic shutdowns, West Virginia's state government was facing a serious budget shortfall. Now, teachers are pushing the federal government to pass more pandemic funding to fill an even bigger gap because of COVID-19. Tonya Rinehart, a reading spe

In a new survey, about 40% of young adults who've aged out of the foster care system said they don't have anywhere to live during the COVID-19 crisis. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. -- Young adults aging out of foster care in the U.S. have been thrown into crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report. Many don't have family to rely on as they face the dangers of homelessness, food insecurity and mental health issues. Celeste Bodner is ex

Some West Virginia counties are easing work requirements for SNAP recipients during the novel coronavirus outbreak. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- With Gov. Jim Justice issuing a stay-at-home order this week to battle COVID-19, a new report warns West Virginia has one of the nation's most vulnerable populations for contracting the deadly virus. The Kaiser Family Foundation study says the Mountain State's rapidly aging po

A survey of Boone County, W.Va., high school students found that 57% use e-cigarettes, almost three times the national average. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Two West Virginia teens concerned about their peers' use of e-cigarettes conducted a poll that now is helping state lawmakers' push to fund tobacco- and vaping-education programs. Kelsi Akers and Haley Ceravolo surveyed almost 600 students in Boone County's three high schools -

Some West Virginia foster parents are troubled by a bill in the Legislature that would reduce licensing requirements for state caseworkers. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Demands on West Virginia's foster-care system have exploded due to the opioid epidemic, and state lawmakers are proposing ways to tackle the crisis. Child-welfare bills announced this week in the Legislature would speed up adoption timelines and create a foster-care bill of rig

Julia Hamilton and her partner, Zack Cruze, hope to get more support for their foster children, who were both born to drug-addicted parents. (Julia Hamilton)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – With the opioid crisis pushing more children into foster care in West Virginia, supporting foster parents is more crucial than ever. Julia Hamilton is a foster parent of two in Morgantown. She says she wishes case workers were able to touch base more often with her, espec

The West Virginia public school system has been searching for ways to fund more counseling and support services for students. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Federal funds could help pay for badly needed behavioral-health support services in public schools, advocates say. Young people from families caught in the drug crisis desperately need the support of counselors and social workers, said Kathleen "Kat" Stoll, director of We

In most states, school districts where families are primarily poor or minority populations tend to have less money to spend on infrastructure. (Giovannacco/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Climate change is overheating classrooms and in the process, hurting education, especially for poor and minority students, according to a new study from the University of California at Los Angeles. As Assistant Professor at UCLA’s department of Public Policy and the

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