Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2018 


A GOP Congressman and former FBI agent tells NPR he believes Trump was compromised by Putin. Also on the Monday rundown: a report on how trade wars could be risky business for the whiskey business: and the wealthiest Americans get richer as the wage gap widens.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Youth Issues

Online access can make children seem separated from adults and the world around them. (Pixabay/Sasint)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Tips for parents trying to bridge the modern media gap with their children - that will be one topic of Thursday night's keynote address at the spring conference of the National Association of Social Workers, West Virginia. Licensed social worker and consultant Marcus Stal

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

The Annie E. Casey Foundation has just issued an important study of children's well-being in West Virginia and around the country. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A high proportion of West Virginia children are living in stubbornly persistent poverty, according to a major new study. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's "Race for Results" report looked at a variety of health, education, family stability and income data by state. In West Virgin

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

New mother Sarah Starks says the Promise Scholarship kept her in the state and shouldn't be cut. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The children's advocacy group Our Children Our Future is releasing its annual legislative priority list. Some items focus on programs at risk in the state's budget crisis. Lawmakers are facing a shortfall of more than $500 billion for next year. And the West Virginia Ce

West Virginia is one of only a few states with rising levels of young people behind bars, and advocates say part of the issue is a lack of behavioral health care. (WV Virginia Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Lack of behavioral health care for children may be undermining West Virginia's efforts to reduce truancy, cut juvenile incarceration and improve foster care, advocates say. They pointed to surveys showing that a much higher than average portion of state high school stude

A new poll shows young Republican voters strongly favor shifting to renewable energy. (Evan Hansen)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Young conservatives overwhelmingly feel manmade climate change is a real problem, according to a just-released poll. These GOP voters strongly favor renewable energy. The national survey of a thousand Republicans ages 18 to 35 was commissioned by Young Conservatives for E

Jim Justice, the Democratic Party candidate for West Virginia governor, says the state has no choice but to find the money to pay for more drug treatment. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Billionaire and gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice is forcefully calling for more drug treatment. But he's vague on how West Virginia could pay for more treatment centers. West Virginia is battling a big budget deficit while, as Justice puts it, opioid addiction has the

1 of 14 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »