Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - CO: Rural/Farming

The 2020 census has suspended field operations, but forms still can be filled out online at 2020Census.gov, over the phone by calling the number provided in your invitation, and by paper through the mail. (Pixabay)

STERLING, Colo. -- The census is supposed to be a complete count of everyone in the country, but people always are missed, and rural residents tend to be undercounted more frequently than others. State Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg, R-Sterling, who represents some two-thirds of the state's eastern plains,

Proponents of reintroducing wolves in Colorado say the animals will help restore a natural balance between predator and prey, and entire ecosystems. (Public Domain Pictures)

DENVER -- Sunday marked 25 years since wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho, and wildlife advocates are hoping Colorado voters will consider the programs' success when deciding on Initiative 107 on the November ballot. The measure would direct Colorado Parks and

Rising global temperatures have caused birds to seek ranges farther north, in higher elevations and along cooler rivers, streams and wetlands. (Artur Rydzewski/Flickr)

FORT COLLINS, Colo. - Migrating birds are showing up in areas much earlier than they would have 20 years ago, as a result of rapid climate change, according to a new report led by Colorado State University with scientists from Cornell and the University of Massachusetts. Report lead author Kyle Hor

Freight Farmsí hydroponic vertical container farms use nearly 99% less water than a traditional farm, running with as little as zero to five gallons per day, less than the average dishwasher. (Pixabay)

HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo. — A Douglas County High School is using a refrigerated freight container converted into a hydroponic farm as an extension of the classroom. At Mountain Vista High School in Highlands Ranch, students learn how to grow leafy greens and other vegetables. And David Larsen,

More than 20 community partners including businesses, city and county governments, the Yampa Valley Community Foundation and others came together to create the Yampa River Fund. (Katkimchee/Wikimedia Commons)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. – The Yampa River is a key contributor to the Colorado River Basin, which provides drinking water for 40 million people across seven states. And now the Yampa has its own dedicated fund. Water funds are used around the world as a tool for bringing diverse interests

Under current Colorado labor law, construction and agricultural workers are not guaranteed meal and rest breaks. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado workers putting in overtime hours but not getting paid overtime rates could get some relief. The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment will hold a public hearing on Wednesday to hear arguments for redefining which workers should be exempt from overtime protections.

The CORE Act would establish a boundary around the 43,000-acre Curecanti National Recreation Area, making it an official unit of the National Park Service. (NPS)

DENVER – A measure that would safeguard some 400,000 acres of public lands across Colorado cleared a key U.S. House committee this week. The Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy, or CORE Act, would protect roughly 200,000 acres of the Thompson Divide from the impacts of oil and gas and ot

Colorado counties are getting food stamps to clients faster, and won more than $2 million in federal performance bonuses in 2016 and 2017. (USDA)

DENVER – Colorado counties are making progress getting SNAP benefits – the program formerly known as food stamps – to low-income residents, but there's still room for improvement. Colorado ranks 43rd nationally with just 60 percent of low-income people receiving benefits, below th

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