Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 18, 2019 


President Trump invited to testify in person or in writing, says Pelosi; a battle over the worth of rooftop-solar electricity when it's sold back to the grid; the flu gets an early start; and the value of Texas family caregivers.

2020Talks - November 18, 2019 


Former Pres. Barack Obama cautioned Democrats to be more moderate, and incumbent Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards wins over Trump-backed Republican opponent.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MA: Human Rights/Racial Justice

Local advocates for renters' rights say far too many Massachusetts residents are living on the edge of homelessness. (RightToTheCity)

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – Advocates for renters' rights say too many tenants in the Bay State live each day on the edge of homelessness. The median income in Springfield is $35,000, but many residents struggle to pay local housing costs because they earn far less, according to Michelin Bewsee, ex

Backers of a new Massachusetts law say restroom choice is only the beginning in the state's efforts to fight discrimination in public accommodations. (DodgertonSkillhause/Morguefile)

BOSTON - It was dubbed the "bathroom bill," but a measure signed into law by Governor Charlie Baker on Friday bans discrimination against transgender people in all public accommodations in the Commonwealth. Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz said in light of the anti-LGBTQ laws being enacted in other states,

Human-rights activists who attended the Boston vigil for the Orlando shooting victims say it is wrong to single out Muslims. (Chris Flynn)

BOSTON -- Human-rights activists in the Commonwealth are expressing support for President Obama's comments in the wake of the shooting in Orlando, Fla. The president condemned Donald Trump's proposal to ban Muslims from the United States. In the wake of Sunday's Orlando nightclub massacre, Obama sa

The future of mandatory minimum sentencing is now in the hands of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. (Swampyank/English Wikipedia)

BOSTON - It is now up to the state's highest court to determine whether a judge in a drug case can impose a sentence lower than the mandatory minimum under state law. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court heard oral arguments last week. ACLU of Massachusetts legal director Matt Segal argues

Immigrants' advocates in the Commonwealth say Donald Trump's popularity doesn't surprise them, given  Massachusetts' conservative attitudes about immigrants' issues. (Michael Vadon)

BOSTON – Advocates for the immigrant community in the Commonwealth took to the State House steps on Wednesday to voice their displeasure with the way the issue of immigration is being treated this election season. Patricia Montes, executive director of the immigrants' rights group Centro Pres

Congress is being urged to make it easier for low-income households to save. A new (AECF) brief says households of color are twice as likely to suffer from asset poverty in the Commonwealth. (Mike Clifford)

BOSTON - A new policy brief is urging Congress to make it easier for low-income families to save. The Annie E. Casey Foundation policy brief finds the racial wealth gap in America is growing. The Foundation's Senior Associate Beadsie Woo says households of color are twice as likely to be experienci

Supporters join Rep. Jay Livingstone, D-Boston, second from right, as lawmakers hold a hearing on a new measure to improve the well-being of hundreds of thousands of children in the Commonwealth. Courtesy: Health Care For All

BOSTON - There is no shortage of state agencies trying to battle health and housing issues in the Commonwealth, but a new bill says a lot more could be accomplished through coordination. Rep. Jay Livingstone, D-Boston, said the measure will help children and families by improving such things as acc

PHOTO: A new JAMA report details reasons that more funding is needed for public health and social service programs, such as Boston's Men's Health Crew, which focuses on preventing domestic violence. The report says the U.S. health system is failing young men of color. Photo courtesy Boston Public Health Commission.

BOSTON - There is no shortage of medical spending or technology in New England, but a new report says young, black men are more likely to survive in prison than they are on the street. While health-care spending is at an all-time high in the United States, said Dr. Stephen Martin of Boston Medical

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