Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2019 


House Democrats prepare for vote condemning Trump's attacks on progressive freshman women. Also on our Tuesday rundown: Immigrants’ rights groups slam asylum rules that take effect today. Plus, summer meals aim to prevent kids' academic slide.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Family/Father Issues

Last year, Colorado's Summer Food Service Program served 1.5 million meals to kids at more than 680 locations across the state. (USDA)

DENVER — Summer should be a fun time for kids, but many Colorado children face greater risks of going hungry after school cafeterias close their doors. More than 600 sites across the state are stepping up to make sure all kids have the nutrition they need to return in the fall ready to learn.

A 2018 survey of 1,800 Coloradans found LGBT Coloradans experience increased rates of stress compared with the general population. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender residents face unfair and avoidable challenges when it comes to financial stability, housing, mental health and substance use issues, according to a new issue brief from the Colorado Health Foundation. Rita Lee, an associate professo

Professional mental health experts say when people open up about their feelings of depression or other issues, don't try to fix the problem or change the subject, but listen patiently and actively. (Publicdomainpictures)

DENVER – STRIDE Community Health Center has joined the Let's Talk Colorado campaign, a coalition of more than 20 health organizations, and this year's emphasis is to address some of the unique challenges men face with mental health. STRIDE psychologist Erin Baurle says men don't seek care at

Colorado workers could be eligible for up to 12 weeks of paid family leave to care for a newborn child, if lawmakers approve SB 19-188. (Maxpixel)

DENVER — A proposal making its way through the state Legislature would create a statewide insurance pool to allow nearly all workers to be with family when health issues arise. Kathy White, deputy director at the Colorado Fiscal Institute, said the vast majority of Coloradans currently do no

Colorado counties are getting food stamps to clients faster, and won more than $2 million in federal performance bonuses in 2016 and 2017. (USDA)

DENVER – Colorado counties are making progress getting SNAP benefits – the program formerly known as food stamps – to low-income residents, but there's still room for improvement. Colorado ranks 43rd nationally with just 60 percent of low-income people receiving benefits, below th

A new plan to prepare for an aging population hopes to harness years of work experience of older Coloradans who want to volunteer or need to remain active in the workforce for financial reasons. (Pixabay)

DENVER – By 2030, one quarter of Colorado's population will be age 60 or older, and a report released this month lays out a road map for navigating this dramatic shift in demographics. Christian Itin, chairman of the state’s Strategic Action Planning Group on Aging, says every aspect o

Under current law, SNAP beneficiaries aged 18-49 not raising children cannot receive benefits for more than three months in a three-year period unless they are employed or are enrolled in a job-training program. (Maxpixel)

DENVER — The Trump administration's proposal to expand work requirements for SNAP benefits - the program formerly known as food stamps - is meant to get more people back into the workforce. But critics argue there’s a far better approach. Kate Kasper, director of public policy at Hunger

Three in four kids who lost health coverage in 2017 live in states that had not expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act. (Pixnio)

DENVER – For the first time in a decade, the number of uninsured children in the United States has gone up. According to a new Georgetown University report, the number of uninsured kids rose by more than 275,000 in 2017, and nearly 4 million children in the U.S. now lack coverage. Erin Mille

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