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PNS Daily Newscast - January 27, 2021 


Biden executive orders address pollution and environmental justice; health professionals note a link between climate change and human health.


2021Talks - January 27 , 2021 


The Senate moves forward with Trump's impeachment trial; scholars question the legality of impeachment after an official is out of office.

Public News Service - NC: Rural/Farming

Feces and urine from hogs on industrial farms are stored in large pools called lagoons. (Adobe Stock)

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TRENTON, N.C. -- State officials are investigating why one million gallons of hog waste spilled into an eastern North Carolina waterway last month. The waste was being stored in a large lagoon, a common practice among the state's hog farms, but environmental advocates warn these types of events cou

Abbott Park, a mobile home park in Lumberton, N.C. Researchers examining the health effects of rising temperatures in counties like Robeson are looking at how higher temperatures can affect residents and exacerbate social vulnerabilities. (Julia Wall/JWALL@NEWSOBSERVER.COM)

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Print version by Adam Wagner Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan Reporting for The Raleigh News & Observer - North Carolina News Service collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting .mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;overflow:hidden;max-width:100%}.mc

Fewer than 1 in 10 North Carolina families receive any type of subsidized childcare from their employer, according to the North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation. (Adobe Stock)

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RALEIGH, N.C. -- Fewer than 1 in 3 parents of young children has access to quality, affordable childcare during the pandemic, according to a new report. The survey of more than 800 North Carolina families found childcare is least accessible in rural counties and in Black, Brown and Indigenous commun

In September, the highest rates of emergency-room visits related to drug overdose occurred in North Carolina's most rural counties, including Caldwell, Richmond and Robeson. (Adobe Stock)

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MARION, N.C. -- Rural North Carolina is battling two health epidemics - substance abuse and COVID-19 - as treatment centers navigate shutdowns and internet-access challenges to address addiction and mental-health issues. In McDowell County, Jacqueline Fox heads McDowell Impact, a peer-support speci

Jos Indalecio, a tractor operator, sits in his living quarters at a Johnston County farmworker camp on Aug. 27. The camp does not have air conditioning, which is considered a luxury by many farmworkers in North Carolina. (Travis Long, TLONG@NEWSOBSERVER.COM)

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Print version by Adam Wagner and Aaron Sánchez-Guerra Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan Reporting for The Raleigh News & Observer - North Carolina News Service collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting .mcclatchy-embed{position:relative;padding:40px 0 56.25%;height:0;ove

The North Carolina Department for Health and Human Services says its goal is to decrease the percentage of children living in food insecure homes from 20.9% to 17.5% by 2025. (Adobe Stock)

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DURHAM, N.C. - Thanksgiving gatherings may be smaller this year, but North Carolinians need access to food more than ever, as the pandemic's economic downturn leaves many households struggling to buy groceries. Katie-Rose Crater, interim co-director of Farmer Foodshare works with farmers of color,

Farmworker Jose Luis Cipriana compares an old and new water pouch design. The pouches hold water bottles in an effort to give farmworkers a chance to stay hydrated during their work day. (Travis Long/tlong@newsobserver.com)

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Print version by Adam Wagner and Aaron Sánchez-Guerra Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan Reporting for The Raleigh News & Observer - North Carolina News Service collaboration with the Pulitzer Center's nationwide Connected Coastlines reporting initiative .mcclatchy-embed{position:relative

In 2019, the city of Brevard received $1 million from the state of North Carolina to undertake a stream-restoration project aimed at preventing the city's water treatment plant from being damaged by high levels of sediment. (Adobe Stock)

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BREVARD, N.C. -- Water systems across North Carolina are in need of repair, yet local government budgets are shrinking amid the economic fallout from the pandemic. Advocates say federal funding is critical to ensuring rural communities have access to clean water. The last major infrastructure packa

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