Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to probe women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - SD: Native American Issues

South Dakota could save more than $6 million a year if it reclassified the charge of ingestion of a drug to a misdemeanor. It is currently a felony. (dantes1401/Twenty20)

PIERRE, S.D. – What role will criminal justice reform play in South Dakota's elections this year? The ACLU of South Dakota says it should be a top issue for candidates. The group is launching its "Smart Justice" campaign today, pushing for a bigger focus on crime's connection to mental healt

In South Dakota, 51 percent say they participate in some form of creative or artistic endeavor. (speedmuseum.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – Key players in South Dakota's creative community will gather in downtown Sioux Falls this weekend for the first statewide arts conference in nearly six years. Jim Speirs, executive director of Arts South Dakota, says many people don't know that the downtown Sioux Falls Sc

The suicide rate for Native Americans in South Dakota is two times higher than the rate for Caucasians. (helpguide.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — South Dakota has created a new toolkit to provide communities with better resources to address the growing number of suicides in the state. South Dakota had the 13th highest suicide rate in the U.S. in 2016, and it was the second leading cause of death among those age 15-

Research has shown that positive approaches to youth crime are more effective than punitive measures such as prison at treating kids. (State Farm/Flickr)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – The annual Racial and Ethnic Fairness Conference is taking place in Sioux Falls today, addressing disparities in the juvenile justice system and how to better treat youth in the system. The keynote speaker is retired professor Doctor Martin Brokenleg, who is speaking abou

The organization Feeding South Dakota is trying mobile food pantries this summer to reach more rural South Dakotans. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

PIERRE, S.D. – Although the number of South Dakotans considered "food insecure" has fallen slightly this year, nearly one in eight still isn't sure where their next meal is coming from. According to Feeding America's "Map the Meal Gap" report, large numbers of South Dakota children are at ri

There are 72,000 veterans in South Dakota. (Lance Cheung/U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)

PIERRE, S.D. – Advocates are encouraging South Dakotans to think about veterans this Independence Day. The state has 66 county and tribal-service officers for vets spread across South Dakota that offer information, assistance, counseling and referrals on subjects such as benefits and veteran p

New research shows that states that have expanded Medicaid coverage are seeing financial and health benefits across their health care systems. (iStockphoto)

PIERRE, S.D. - Unlike South Dakota, states that have expanded Medicaid coverage are seeing benefits across their health care systems, according to a new report. After looking at safety net hospitals and clinics in seven states, researchers at the Georgetown University Center for Children and Familie

As part of National Stroke Awareness Month, health experts are urging South Dakotans to speak with their doctors about their risks, including high blood pressure. (iStockphoto)

PIERRE, S.D. – May is National Stroke Awareness Month, and South Dakota health experts are urging people to be aware of the warning signs, and to take preventive measures. Having a stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the U.S., but researchers say it's oftentimes more disabling than

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