Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2019 


A bipartisan deal reached to avert U.S. government default. Also on our Tuesday rundown: a new report calculates the high hospital costs for employers. Plus, new legislation could help protect Florida's at-risk wildlife.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NE: Family/Father Issues

Raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 would reduce the number of people in the U.S. living in poverty by 1.3 million. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – The benefits of raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 would far outweigh any costs, according to a report released this week by the Congressional Budget Office. Former U.S. Labor Department chief economist Heidi Shierholz, now a senior economist with the Econ

Law-enforcement jurisdictions have been ending their agreements with ICE because of increased costs to local taxpayers, increased risks of racial profiling, and damaging relations between communities and law enforcement.(Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. — Dakota County immigrant communities targeted by the Trump administration's recent promise of mass deportation aren't getting any relief from local law enforcement. Sheriff Chris Kleinberg recently renewed his department's commitment to cooperating with the Department of Homelan

Immigrant households that would benefit from a new Dream Act contribute more than $17 billion in federal taxes and nearly $10 billion in state and local taxes annually. (P.A.Gethen/Wikimedia Commons)

OMAHA, Neb. – This week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation that would provide more than two million people a path to permanent residency and citizenship. The American Dream and Promise Act includes so-called "Dreamers," who entered the country as children, and people with

People with full-time jobs are encouraged to participate in the state's foster care system, where training and ongoing support is available. (USDOD)

OMAHA, Neb. – May is National Foster Care Month, and the Nebraska Children's Home Society is working to bring more potential families into the state's foster care system by removing barriers to participation. This year's theme is "Foster Care as a support for families, not a substitute for p

A new report shows that many Americans who frequently don't know how they'll pay for their next meal earn too much to qualify for federal food assistance. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – A new Feeding America report shows in every county and Congressional district in the U.S., a subset of the population can't afford to buy food on a consistent basis. Adam Dewey, the group's research director, says in some states, one in four children is at risk of missing a m

In 2017, 546 Nebraska children were adopted from foster care. The average length of time spent in foster care before adoption was just over 31 months. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Officials from child welfare agencies in Nebraska and across the country are headed to Washington this month to exchange hard-won lessons for helping children and families navigate foster care, adoption and child abuse prevention. They'll also meet with lawmakers to highlight

In 2012, there were 176,000 stay-at-home dads responsible for taking care of children. (Onkelbo/Wikimedia Commons)

OMAHA, Neb. – As Nebraskans tip their hats to social workers during National Social Work Month, Nebraska Children's Home Society is celebrating one year of Fatherhood P³, a father-to-father, community-based service. Program coordinator David Pollock says fathers carry anxiety about all

Nebraska workers could be eligible for up to 12 weeks of paid family leave to care for a newborn child, if lawmakers approve LB 311. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Just 16 percent of Nebraska workers currently have access to paid family and medical leave, but a new bill making its way through the state Legislature would create a statewide insurance pool to allow nearly all workers to be with family when health issues arise. Tiffany Seib

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