Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 26, 2019 


Mueller to testify in open session; migrant children returned to troubled detention center; plus ending the school-to-prison pipeline, and seeking justice for Native Americans killed at Wounded Knee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Poverty

Until lifting it last week, West Virginia was one of only three states to maintain a ban on accessing SNAP benefits for people with drug felony convictions. (WV Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Recovering addicts say a change in West Virginia food-assistance rules will help them stay clean and out of trouble. Last week, a new law went into effect allowing people with drug felony convictions to qualify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly cal

Critics say that behind the Trump administration's rhetoric, the White House budget contains a lot of cruelty. (Pexels/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Critics are calling the Trump administration's latest spending plan a "bully's budget," saying its kiss-up, kick-down attitude is a built-in feature, not an accident. In part to pay for tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy, the budget released last week cuts three qu

For a number of years, West Virginia has done a better job of providing healthcare access for children than many other states. (Bess-Hamiti/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – For the first time in years, the number of children without health insurance has risen, in West Virginia and across the country. The rate in West Virginia is still less than 3 percent, which is well below the national average. But according to Joan Alker, executive direct

Former addicts in West Virginia say making it easier for reformed felons to receive public benefits would help them stay free of drugs. (lechenie-narkomanii/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Reformed drug felons in West Virginia are blocked from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and some want the Legislature to fix that. West Virginia is one of only three states that has a lifetime SNAP ban for anyone convicted of a drug-related felony. That a

Before the state expanded Medicaid, rural West Virginians were much less likely to have health insurance than their urban peers. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A new report says expanding Medicaid is really paying off for rural West Virginians. Rural areas typically have real disadvantages – higher unemployment and poverty, fewer doctors and in some cases, financially strapped hospitals. But Kelli Caseman, director of Ch

The current agriculture bill, which impacts farm commodity prices and nutrition programs, expires Sept. 30. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Congress may not be able to finish the farm bill by the end of the month, when the old one expires. One deadlock is a controversial plan to cut access to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Josh Protas, vice president for public policy with Jewish hunger-relief

Former miner Jared Blalock is 12 weeks from finishing a two-year degree he says he may transfer to Marshall University. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A former miner from Mingo County says the hardest part of starting a new career in southern West Virginia is believing that you can. But one organization is helping bridge that gap for local workers. Jared Blalock from Williamson turned to the Coalfield Development Corpora

Critics charge the only way changes being proposed in Congress to SNAP would save the government money is by ending food assistance to eligible households. (American Heart Association)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress would mean an explosion of red tape and bureaucracy for states and the poor, according to a new report. Rules added to SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, could include much tig

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