Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 8, 2020 


COVID-19 prompts a car insurance break for some drivers. Also, a push for postal banking, and for grocery workers to be treated as first responders.

2020Talks - April 8, 2020 


Wisconsin held its primary yesterday in the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic. But a shortage of poll workers led to just five polling stations in Milwaukee instead of the usual 180.

Public News Service - AR: Budget Policy & Priorities

Coronavirus testing and treatment in Norway is free and widely available. (Adobe Stock)

By George Lakey Broadcast version by Nadia Ramlagan Reporting for the YES! Magazine Media-Arkansas News Service Collaboration LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Norwegians locked themselves down on March 12 to deal with a spike in positive tests for the new coronavirus. The government in Oslo moved quickly and e

Research has shown that for every uncounted Arkansan, the state will lose around $3,000 each year for the next 10 years. (Adobe Stock)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - The U.S. Census Bureau is temporarily suspending field operations to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. Federal law requires census data be presented to the president by the end of the year, and the national survey would typically end by mid-summer. But in the face of a g

Last year, China bought nearly 264,000 tons of soybeans from farmers in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (Adobe Stock)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Arkansas lost more than 24,000 jobs between 2001 and 2018 because of the ongoing trade deficit with China, according to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute. Over the past two decades, the United States steadily has imported more goods from China than it exports, and

Scientists have determined that around 90% of a child's brain is developed by age 5. (Adobe Stock)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- A group of lawmakers from both sides of the political aisle agree Arkansas needs to invest more in its youngest residents. They've formed a caucus focused on creating evidence-based policies for the 2021 General Assembly. Executive director of Arkansas Advocates for Children a

A new report shows that fewer children are signed up for health coverage in Arkansas and across the country. (Pixabay)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – After a decade of steady improvement, the number of children with health insurance is dropping, in Arkansas and across the nation. A new report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families shows that nationwide, the number of kids without health coverage

A recent report says 31 percent of Arkansas children live in homes where their parents lack secure employment, and 24 percent of Arkansas children live in poverty. (401(K)20Twenty)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The State of Arkansas is ending this fiscal year with almost $42 million more in its coffers than previously projected. And the Department of Finance attributes that to higher-than-expected individual income tax and sales tax collections. But while the money is no doubt

Forked Mountain is a prominent feature of the Flatside Wilderness area in central Arkansas. (Wikimedia Commons)<br /><br />

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Conservationists are praising a measure designed to expand the Flatside Wilderness area of the Ouachita National Forest in Central Arkansas. Congressman French Hill has filed legislation that would increase the 9,500-acre wilderness area by an additional 640 acres this ye

Arkansas ranks ninth in the nation in the value of grain sorghum produced annually, exporting the majority of it to China. (Arkansas Farm Bureau)

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – If President Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum imports start a trade war, Arkansas could take an almost $400 million hit to its economy. Agricultural economists at the University of Arkansas say if the state's major trading partners retaliate with similar impor

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