Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 22, 2018 


GOP leadership puts its efforts to fix immigration on hold. Also on the Friday rundown: Florida students take their gun control message to the Midwest; and a call for renewal of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Livable Wages/Working Families

In the current market, natural gas is much less expensive than coal as fuel for West Virginia power plants. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Calling itself a grassroots citizens group, an organization opposing new gas power plants is getting key backing from coal baron Bob Murray and Murray Energy. The Ohio Valley Jobs Alliance has said it was founded by retired West Virginia miners in the northern panhandle,

Critics charge the only way changes being proposed in Congress to SNAP would save the government money is by ending food assistance to eligible households. (American Heart Association)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) now under debate in Congress would mean an explosion of red tape and bureaucracy for states and the poor, according to a new report. Rules added to SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, could include much tig

Black Lung is an incurable disease caused by breathing coal dust, which gets worse until a miner dies. (Yale Rosen/Fickr)

MATEWAN, W.Va. — A group of miners has put forward a plan for a state black lung program. It would solve problems in the federal system they say now stop miners from getting benefits. Eighty percent of the funds in the federal black lung program go to doctors, lawyers, judges and bureaucrats

West Virginia spends about 20 percent less on school workers as a proportion of the state's Gross Domestic Product than it did eight years ago. (W. Va. Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Striking teachers are angry about rising health care premiums and eroding benefits from West Virginia's Public Employee Insurance Agency. But what would a real PEIA fix look like? School workers, who are away from their classrooms for an eighth day today, say they want mo

According to the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, a proposed business tax cut would have cost the same as an 11-percent raise for teachers and school service workers. (Sean O'Leary/WV COBP)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson County, says the state can only afford a 4-percent pay raise for teachers. But is that true? Critics point out that Carmichael started the legislative session backing a plan to cut taxes on business machinery, eq

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

Food pantries reported a rise in requests for help in the nine West Virginia counties where work requirements were added to the SNAP program. (WV Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia lawmakers who want to add work requirements to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program argue that many of the people now getting SNAP are shirking employment, but evidence suggests that's not true. Angie Williams is a single mother of four with a full-t

The parents of children who get care through CHIP are watching Congress anxiously. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Without renewed funding from Congress, the West Virginia Children's Health Insurance Program is running on fumes - which is worrying families. At the end of next month, the program will stop new enrollment, a first step in winding down. That's scary for the parents of th

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