Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Livable Wages/Working Families

Before the state expanded Medicaid, rural West Virginians were much less likely to have health insurance than their urban peers. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A new report says expanding Medicaid is really paying off for rural West Virginians. Rural areas typically have real disadvantages – higher unemployment and poverty, fewer doctors and in some cases, financially strapped hospitals. But Kelli Caseman, director of Ch

Unions allege that Florida-based contractor Seminole Equipment cut corners and did substandard work when painting a bridge on I-64. (The Affiliated Construction Trades)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A highway contractor that was found to not be withholding West Virginia state payroll taxes for a decade is being required by the state to pay back only two years' worth. Florida industrial painting company Seminole Equipment was the low bidder on a South Charleston bridg

West Virginia has the second highest rate of student loan defaults, and the average debt for graduates has grown by 70 percent since 2005. (bitnovosti)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Some West Virginians fighting student loan debt say they feel they've been given a life sentence - a debt sentence. The state has the nation's highest rate of graduates with debt, and the second highest rate of loan defaults. Eric Engle of Parkersburg is an office worker

Former miner Jared Blalock is 12 weeks from finishing a two-year degree he says he may transfer to Marshall University. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — A former miner from Mingo County says the hardest part of starting a new career in southern West Virginia is believing that you can. But one organization is helping bridge that gap for local workers. Jared Blalock from Williamson turned to the Coalfield Development Corpora

Studies say right-to-work laws don't create jobs and tend to suppress wages. Union workers like pipefitter James Robinette say they can see that on the ground. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – West Virginia Republicans are running for election on what they describe as the "great" economy. State unions call that putting lipstick on a pig. Pointing to GOP lawmakers' "pro-growth" policies, state Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson, described West Virginia

The U.S. Energy Information Agency sees little boost to West Virginia coal production from ending the Clean Power Plan. (U.S. EIA)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – President Donald Trump's visit to Charleston on Tuesday highlighted a plan to loosen carbon-pollution rules - but according to the federal government's own figures, that isn't likely to spark much growth in coal jobs. Trump's plan would let states, instead of the Environm

The West Virginia Legislature passed a right-to-work law shortly after being taken over by the GOP. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — Right-to-work laws do not bring jobs, but in fact reduce wages, according to new research. Right-to-work laws say that even workers covered by union contracts don't have to pay anything toward the cost of getting and keeping the contract. Supporters argue that states wit

During the teachers' strike, the West Virginia State Senate was widely viewed as the main obstacle to meeting strikers' demands. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael now appears to be taking credit for the teacher pay raises he failed to stop earlier this year. When school employees went on statewide strike, the Republican-led Senate was blocking the higher pay they were demanding. But l

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