Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 17, 2019 


Trump once again floats the idea of being president beyond two terms. Also on the Monday rundown: A new national report ranks children's well-being, from coast to coast; and a Family Care Act gains support.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Livable Wages/Working Families

Renewable energy provided a greater percentage of U.S. electricity than coal this spring, a pattern observers expect more often as solar and wind power rise and coal declines. (IEEFA/EIA)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – This spring, renewable energy sources for a time generated more electricity than coal in the U.S., according to federal figures. Green energy supporters say West Virginia lawmakers are ignoring that important reality. The numbers fluctuate day to day, but last April 

When the West Virginia Senate goes back into special session today, the leadership probably will have the votes to pass a nearly 150-page education bill. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Stiff opposition looks likely to force the breakup of the big education bill now in the West Virginia state Senate. Gov. Jim Justice said Senate Bill 1039 - the so-called Student Success Act - goes too far in trying to push through unlimited charter schools, among many ot

Construction has started on the controversial Rockwool insulation manufacturing plant. (Brent Walls, Upper Potomac Riverkeeper)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The Legislature will consider expanding tax breaks around the target="parent">controversial Rockwool project. Opponents say that will hurt the quality of life in the West Virginia county with the lowest unemployment. The insulation-manufacturing plant under construction

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice told striking teachers Tuesday that he wants a pay-raise bill that does not include any more than a pilot program for charter schools. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – The wave of school strikes that started in West Virginia a year ago seems to be moving more funding into public education, nationally. According to a report by the American Federation of Teachers, average K-12 funding stalled or fell between 2008 and last year. Economis

Sissonville English teacher Katrina Minney is not an officer with a teachers' union, but she did take part in last year's walkout. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - What critics call a union-busting provision in a huge, fast-moving education bill in the West Virginia Legislature has many saying it's revenge for last year's successful teachers' strike. One part of omnibus Senate Bill 451 would make West Virginia teachers' unions get permissi

Black lung is an incurable progressive disease among coal miners that ultimately can make it impossible to breathe. (Jack Corn/National Archives/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — Inaction by a stalemated Congress has gutted important black-lung funding, at a time when the number of cases in West Virginia is rising rapidly. In spite of promises by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others, a temporary increase in the per-ton tax on coal is

Solar installer is the fastest-growing job in the country, but few of these positions are coming to West Virginia. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Clean-energy advocates are looking to the Legislature for solar-energy rules they say could reform West Virginia's grid for consumers, big and small. West Virginia doesn't allow Power Purchase Agreements – where a third party invests the big up-front costs of instal

West Virginia has long struggled to deal with the environmental impacts, and the boom-and-bust economic cycles, of the gas and coal industries. (Bill Hughes)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Why do so many places rich in natural resources, like West Virginia, end up so poor? Ted Boettner, executive director at the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, has been researching what's known as the "Resource Curse." He's found most states and countries focused

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