Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 22, 2019 


Trump lashes out at critics who claim he abuses his office; a strike at JFK airport; gun control bills in Wisconsin; a possible link between air pollution and violent crime; and very close foreign elections.

2020Talks - October 22, 2019 


After a settlement instead of what would have been the first trial in the landmark court case on the opioid crisis, we look at what 2020 candidates want to do about drug pricing.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Budget Policy & Priorities

Sissonville English teacher Katrina Minney is not an officer with a teachers' union, but she did take part in last year's walkout. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - What critics call a union-busting provision in a huge, fast-moving education bill in the West Virginia Legislature has many saying it's revenge for last year's successful teachers' strike. One part of omnibus Senate Bill 451 would make West Virginia teachers' unions get permissi

The West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy found no link between states that do not tax companies' inventory, machinery or equipment and faster job growth. (WV COBP)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The governor and legislative leaders again are considering repealing the personal property tax for businesses. But according to the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, it's unlikely to bring job growth. Last year, lawmakers looked at ending that tax on inventory,

Black lung is an incurable progressive disease among coal miners that ultimately can make it impossible to breathe. (Jack Corn/National Archives/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — Inaction by a stalemated Congress has gutted important black-lung funding, at a time when the number of cases in West Virginia is rising rapidly. In spite of promises by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others, a temporary increase in the per-ton tax on coal is

West Virginia has long struggled to deal with the environmental impacts, and the boom-and-bust economic cycles, of the gas and coal industries. (Bill Hughes)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Why do so many places rich in natural resources, like West Virginia, end up so poor? Ted Boettner, executive director at the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, has been researching what's known as the "Resource Curse." He's found most states and countries focused

For a number of years, West Virginia has done a better job of providing healthcare access for children than many other states. (Bess-Hamiti/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – For the first time in years, the number of children without health insurance has risen, in West Virginia and across the country. The rate in West Virginia is still less than 3 percent, which is well below the national average. But according to Joan Alker, executive direct

Public forestland such as Cranberry Glades is central to West Virginia's identity. (Mike Costello)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — With the elections over and deer hunters returning to West Virginia's woods, conservationists are looking forward to better prospects for public lands, thanks to changes in Congress. The current U.S. Interior Department has moved to shrink some public lands out West, and

In the last West Virginia legislative election, some races were decided by as few as 13 votes. (Wokandapix/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — In the last two elections, West Virginia has had one of the lowest turnout rates in the country. Many West Virginians have said they don’t think their vote matters. But in a lot of cases, it does – just ask Rod Snyder. In the last election, Snyder lost a hotly

Three years ago, there were about 4,600 foster children in West Virginia. The number now is close to 6,700. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – West Virginia is in a foster care crisis, as many addicted parents lose custody of their children. According to a new group for foster parents, state government needs to consult more with the families taking the kids in. Marissa Sanders is a foster parent and founder of

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