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PNS Daily News - December 13, 2019 


Brexit wins at the polls in the U.K.; major changes come to New England immigration courts today; and more than a million acres in California have been cleared for oil and gas drilling.

2020Talks - December 13, 2013  


The House passes legislation to reign in drug prices, Sen. Bernie Sanders is on the upswing, and entrepreneur Andrew Yang plays Iowa congressional candidate J.D. Scholten - who's running against long-time incumbent Steve King - in a game of basketball.

Public News Service - NE: Children's

A recent study of elementary and middle schools found decreasing high caloric beverages such as soda and juice, and increasing water consumption, promoted child health and decreased childhood obesity. (GSquare/Pixabay)

LYONS, Neb. – Children spend a significant portion of their days in school for most of the calendar year, and public health advocates are concerned that too many are not drinking enough water, which can lead to a host of negative issues. Jordan Rasmussen, policy manager for the Center for Ru

A new Trump administration proposal would reduce food-stamp benefits for low-income families with higher utility bills, cutting benefits for roughly one out of every five households that participate in SNAP. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Time is running out for the public to comment on the Trump administration's third proposal this year for changing the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps. The latest move would cut $4.5 billion from the program over five years by changing

The highest rate of uninsured children in Nebraska isn't among families with the lowest incomes, but working families who make from $29,000 to $53,000 annually for a family of three. (DOD)

LINCOLN, Neb. - The number of children across the country who lack health insurance increased by more than 400,000 between 2016 and 2018, and progress made in Nebraska has stalled, according to a new Georgetown University report. Molly McCleery, health-care access program director for Nebraska Appl

Studies show that unaddressed bullying can lead affected students to have poorer academic performance, miss or drop out of school, turn to alcohol or other drugs, and even attempt suicide. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. — October is national Bullying Prevention Month, and a new ACLU Nebraska report shows the problem continues to impact too many of the state's students. Rose Godinez, legal and policy counsel with the group, pointed to one middle school student, named Margaret in the report, who

Scientists warn that a warming planet will lead to less productive soil, restricting what can be grown and reducing the soil's ability to absorb carbon. (Nicepik)

LINCOLN, Neb. - Inspired by 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg of Sweden and record-breaking spring floods, Nebraska students are joining a global climate strike this Friday, with events scheduled in Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha. Brittni McGuire with Nebraska Climate Strike is organizing a m

A single person with no children can earn up to $1,247 a month and qualify for federal food assistance, and most recipients have to work at least 20 hours a week. (Pixabay)

RALSTON, Neb. – Children's advocates are hoping Nebraskans will weigh in on a proposal by the Trump administration that could kick more than 3 million people, including children, out of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). If implemented, an estimated 265,000 children nation

Use of programs including Medicaid, SNAP and Section 8 public housing will factor into the determination by immigration officials of who gets a green card. (Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. — The Trump administration has finalized a new rule that could deny green cards to immigrants if they access public benefits - including health care, nutrition and housing assistance - or if officials believe they might do so in the future. Olivia Golden, executive director at

Raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 would reduce the number of people in the U.S. living in poverty by 1.3 million. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – The benefits of raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 would far outweigh any costs, according to a report released this week by the Congressional Budget Office. Former U.S. Labor Department chief economist Heidi Shierholz, now a senior economist with the Econ

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