Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 24, 2019 


The Supreme Court considers U.S. Census citizenship question – we have a pair of reports. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A look at how poor teacher pay and benefits can threaten preschoolers' success. And the Nevada Assembly votes to restore voting rights for people who've served their time in prison.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CT: Criminal Justice

Other New England states are ahead of Connecticut in restoring voting rights to people in the criminal justice system. (landrachuk/Pixabay)

HARTFORD, Conn. – A bill to restore the vote to thousands of Connecticut residents is getting a hearing Thursday in the General Assembly. The Government Administration and Elections Committee is hearing testimony on HB 5418. If passed the bill would give some 4,000 people who are in custody

Advocates for people in prison say the quality of health care in Connecticut prisons is a long-standing issue. (Andrea Sears)

HARTFORD, Conn. — Prisoners’ rights advocates are calling for new legislation to protect inmates’ health, safety and human rights, after a woman gave birth in a Connecticut prison cell. Officials at the York Correctional Institution in Niantic have launched an investigation into

Troopers allegedly discussed making up charges as a camera recorded their voices. (Hans/Pixabay)

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Connecticut State Police are refusing media requests for copies of documents from internal investigations of a trooper and two sergeants accused of fabricating charges. The investigation centered on the 2015 arrest of an East Hartford man who was recording the encounter on his c

Nationally, African American children are six times more likely to have a parent in jail than are white children. (Amanda Mills/pixnio.com)

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Mass incarceration of African Americans has contributed significantly to the racial achievement gap in the nation's schools, according to a recent report. The so-called war on drugs vastly expanded the U.S. prison population. But while African Americans are no more likely to sel

Mental health experts say prolonged isolation can worsen and even cause mental illness. (jmiller291/Flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Lawmakers and advocates for people in prison on Tuesday are bringing a replica of a solitary confinement cell to the State Capitol as they call for reform legislation. Their point is that solitary confinement can worsen or even cause mental illness, and that prolonged isola

Conn. is starting to consider age at the time of the offense in parole hearings.  (Dieter_G/pixabay.com)

HARTFORD, Conn. - U.S. Supreme Court rulings have made prisoners sentenced to life without parole as juveniles eligible for release, but a new report said very few are being granted parole. "False Hope," a national report from the ACLU, found that across the country parole boards rarely consider the

In Connecticut, 82 percent of the people involved in taser incidents last year were unarmed. (Junglecat/Wikimedia Commons)

HARTFORD, Conn. – Civil rights advocates say a first-of-its-kind report on the use of tasers shows that police in Connecticut need better training. Connecticut is the first state to require annual reports on police use of the electric shock devices. According to David McGuire, legislative an

Connecticut's prison population fell 17 percent and crime decreased by 25 percent between 2006 and 2014. (my_southborough/Flickr)

HARTFORD, Conn. - States that reduce their prison populations are seeing their crime rates go down, too. In the 1990s, getting "tough on crime" led to a rapid rise in the number of people incarcerated. Now, with more than 2 million behind bars, the United States has the largest prison population in

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