Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 22, 2019 


Trump lashes out at critics who claim he abuses his office; a strike at JFK airport; gun control bills in Wisconsin; a possible link between air pollution and violent crime; and very close foreign elections.

2020Talks - October 22, 2019 


After a settlement instead of what would have been the first trial in the landmark court case on the opioid crisis, we look at what 2020 candidates want to do about drug pricing.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MT: Livable Wages/Working Families

From 2015-17, 58% of 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds in Montana were not in school. (New Africa/Adobe Stock)

HELENA, Mont. – School is back in session, but not for many of Montana's preschool-age children this year. After the state Legislature funded a two-year preschool pilot program in 2017, lawmakers were unable to come up with a deal this year to continue backing early childhood education, sett

Coal-ash ponds at the Colstrip Power Plant are leaking about 200 million gallons of contaminants a year into the ground, according to a new report. (Eric Warren)

COLSTRIP, Mont. – Thoroughly cleaning up coal-ash ponds at the Colstrip Power Plant would lead to a significant number of jobs, according to a new report. The Northern Plains Resource Council and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 1638, representing maintenance and operations wor

MEA-MFT and the Montana Public Employees Union members say their merger will create a more united labor front at the Montana capitol. (Mark Holloway/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – Montana's two largest public-employee unions are moving closer to joining forces. On January 20, members of MEA-MFT and the Montana Public Employees Association will gather in Helena's Great Northern Hotel to ratify a proposed constitution and create the Montana Federation of P

Montana's wind sector has the potential to power 6.4 million homes by 2030, according to the U.S. Dept. of Energy.  (David J. LaPorte/Flickr)

BILLINGS, Mont. – How does the country move toward renewable energy in a way that benefits working families? That's one issue being addressed at the 46th annual Northern Plains Resource Council meeting on Saturday. Keynote speaker Tyson Slocum is the energy program director for Public Citize

Rep. Greg Gianforte, R-Mont., visited a small meat processor after reports it had been harassed by a federal meat inspector. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

BUTTE, Mont. – Small meat processors in Montana hope the state's Congressional delegation will act soon to rein in a regional food inspector from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Last month, Montana Standard ran a story on harassment from Food Safety and Inspection Service front-line supe

Direct-care workers could lose out on benefits if Montana lawmakers choose to make drastic cuts to the Dept. of Health and Human Services. (Drew Tarvin/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – Montana home-care workers are urging the Legislature to find a better way to fill a massive hole in the state budget. The state could slash agency budgets by 10 percent in order to make up its $228-million deficit. Cuts to the Department of Health and Human Services would come

A bill in the Montana House would increase wages for state employees by one-percent, both in 2017 and 2018. (J Haeske/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – State workers are calling a bill to increase salaries by one percent over each of the next two years a modest raise, critical for Montana's 14,500 state employees. House Bill 13 was negotiated before the session between MEA-MFT, the Montana Public Employees Association, AFSCME

As Montana lawmakers head back to Helena, a report on the economic status of women shows they have some work to do. (Tracy/Flickr)

HELENA, Mont. – As the Montana legislative session begins Monday, a report shows the state has a lot of work to do to help Treasure State women improve their economic status. In the latest "Status of Women in the States" data, Montana receives a grade of D-minus for its policies, and a ranki

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