Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 8, 2020 


COVID-19 prompts a car insurance break for some drivers. Also, a push for postal banking, and for grocery workers to be treated as first responders.

2020Talks - April 8, 2020 


Wisconsin held its primary yesterday in the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic. But a shortage of poll workers led to just five polling stations in Milwaukee instead of the usual 180.

Public News Service - NY: Civil Rights

Karl Taylor (L) was one of nearly 10,000 people in New York prisons who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. (Photo courtesy Julia Ramsay-Nobles)

NEW YORK -- Attorneys have reached a landmark $5 million settlement in a lawsuit over the 2015 death of a New York state prisoner at the hands of corrections officers. Prison officials had claimed that 51-year-old Karl Taylor died of a heart attack. But lawyers for Taylor's family alleged the man,

With mobile device forensic tools, police can decrypt and download all the information on a cell phone. (Saklakova/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK - New Yorkers have a right to know how police are searching their cell phones, according to a lawsuit filed against the NYPD. The suit was filed in State Supreme Court more than 10 months after the NYPD first received a freedom-of-information request (FOIA) for records on its use of mobil

Plaintiffs in the lawsuit include six active-duty military members and two potential enlistees. (Bumble Dee/Adobe Stock)

New York - The Pentagon can't hide documents it relied upon to justify its ban on transgender people serving openly in the military. That's the ruling in a federal lawsuit challenging the ban. For the past 18 months, lawyers for the individual plaintiffs and groups that filed the suit have sough

The Green Light New York law will improve public safety and generate $57 million in annual revenue. (Africa Studio/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK — Immigration advocates are celebrating this week as New York restored the right of all state residents to obtain a driver's license, including undocumented immigrants. In the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attack, then-Gov. George Pataki issued an executive order requiring all driv

Three separate court rulings last week blocked federal efforts to step up immigrant detentions and deportations. (JP Photography/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK – Unionized workers in New York are praising three recent court rulings that uphold the rights of immigrants. In three separate rulings last Friday, federal judges blocked the Trump administration's attempt to detain immigrant children indefinitely and issued a preliminary injunction

The Green Light Law would give 750,000 immigrants in New York access to a driver's license. (Nomad_Soul/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK – Restoring immigrants' access to driver's licenses would benefit all New Yorkers – that's the message of a motion filed in federal court on Wednesday. Earlier this year, New York passed the Green Light New York Law, allowing immigrants to obtain driver's licenses. But the law

Robert M. Pennoyer, now and at age 19, on the U.S.S. Pensacola at Iwo Jima in 1944 (Courtesy: Robert M. Pennoyer)

NEW YORK – Seventy-four years after he saw the flag raised on Iwo Jima, a World War II veteran has an Independence Day message for America: The fight for liberty goes on, and today's enemies are ignorance and indifference to justice. Ninety-four-year-old Bob Pennoyer saw the American flag ra

Three-quarters of New York City subway stations still are inaccessible for wheelchair users. (Tdorante10 [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)])

NEW YORK — A federal class-action lawsuit claims New York City's subway system has broken the law by failing to make stations wheelchair accessible. The lawsuit was filed by the group Disability Rights Advocates on behalf of individual plaintiffs and a coalition of disability organizations.

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